A page from the Los Angeles Herald newspaper announcing Capt. Nellie Truelove’s commission as a member of the LAPD

On March 4, 1903, the Los Angeles Herald newspaper reported that Salvation Army Captain Nellie Truelove would be the first woman “to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority.”

Captain Nellie Truelove

Born in London in 1863, the aptly-named Capt. Truelove ran a home for “fallen” women at the turn of the 20th century in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.

The word “fallen” in those days referred to women who worked as prostitutes or were pregnant and unmarried.

Capt. Truelove’s rescue work involved spending days and nights in bars and brothels trying to ease the burden of women in trouble. She believed that no matter how dire the circumstance, there was hope for every woman she met.

Courtesy of California Digital Newspaper Collection

Often, she would be called on to referee disputes between the ladies in her care — or their clients — so the Los Angeles Police Department trusted her with the authority to keep the peace as an official member of the force.

Just one year after she received her star and billy club she died. Reportedly, among her last words were, “take care of my girls” and “it was worth it all.”

On the day of her funeral, the streets were lined with thousands of people as eight policemen led a white hearse drawn by four white horses. As her cortege passed the red light district, the bar owners and bartenders who knew her well stood outside with doors closed and hats off, out of respect.

The full article reads: 

She Wears A Star | Nellie Truelove Joins the Police Force

Salvation Lass Appointed by the Commission | May Exercise Authority at Rescue Home in East Los Angeles – Fryburg & Berkowitz Saloon License Case Ended – Police Duty at Schools

Demure little Nellie Truelove is a member of the Los Angeles police force, distinguished in that she is the first woman to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority. Nellie Truelove is used to the blue uniform and not unaccustomed to the exercise of authority, for, in addition to being a”policeman,” she is Staff Captain Nellie of The Salvation Army, in charge of the Salvation Army Rescue home on Griffith street in East Los Angeles. J. S. Slauson introduced The Salvation Army lass to Mayor Snyder; she was recommended, the mayor said, “by the best people of the city.”

When the police commission had waded through a part of the accumulation of business before it, the mayor called attention to the presence of “Staff Captain Nellie Truelove,” who asked to be clothed with police power. Commissioner Keeney wore his most cherubic smile when the blue-gowned young woman was presented. Commissioner Maglnnis, “the man from Mexico,” whose first appearance it was at a board meeting, looked as though he was glad that the mayor had given him the job.

Commissioner Lang wheeled about, so that he might be in range of the smiling but embarrassed face of the applicant for a place on the police force. The mayor, of course, was radiant. He is at his best when women are present. For instance, the other day he deliberately violated a city ordinance that he might do a woman a good turn. She called late in the afternoon to inform the mayor that a policeman had threatened her with arrest if she persisted in tooting her fish horn—the woman was a fish peddler. She said that she could not sell the fish If she might not toot the horn, and a stock on hands would be spoiled. The mayor told her to go on and blow the fish horn until her stock was sold, and if any policeman interfered, to refer him to the mayor.

Advice to Women

If you want anything from the mayor, just be a woman; he will find a way to gratify the want. When Nellie Truelove came with her unusual request, the mayor for a time was lost in doubt, but Herbert J. Goudge, the assistant city attorney, was called for counsel, and gave it as his opinion that there was nothing in the law governing the police department that forbade appointment of a woman.

Of course, she will be but a special “policeman,” her authority being confined to the rescue home, where often there are admitted women whose only fear is of a police officer. It is Impracticable to call upon the regular police every time there is a disturbance at the home, and It is not the wish of the home management to have every rebellious inmate arrested and taken to the police station.

The Fryburg & Berkowitz saloon license at 245 East First street, which has been in controversy for several weeks, was disposed of, by allowing the application for a transfer to Charles Toegel. Frank Reese asked for a continuance of one week to give Fryburg a chance to be heard. Toefcel wanted the matter settled and out of the way. His story of entering into partnership with Fryburg, as Toegel told it, was that of the innocent victim of an unscrupulous and designing lawbreaker. “After I learned that Fryburg was not what you might say an up and down honest man.” continued the speaker, he was anxious to get out of the partnership, and sold his interest in the business to the Los Angeles Brewing company.

Mayor Snyder will give paternal advice to the board of education, whose members authorized the board secretary to make a request for a. policeman who would be at all times ready to answer a call from superintendents of schools, when boys or girls became obstreperous and lost awe of the birch. The school board secretury made this pointed demand:

A Pointed Demand

“At a meeting of the board of education, held February 24, I was Instructed to communicate to you the request of the board that you detail a police officer who may be called upon at any time by the superintendents of schools, as cases very often occur where immediate action is necessary, and delays have many times occurred and the object been defeated because of there being no officer available when wanted.”

Chief of Police Elton assured the police board members that the house duty men at the police station are always available to be called to reinforce the school superintendents.

Pressman & Henry were granted a liquor license at 344 South Spring street, the license that was lost by Paul Kerkow for violation of the Sunday closing law.

J. K. Miller was allowed a transfer of his license from the Arcade station to the corner of Central and Ceres avenues. Edward Bode was made a special policeman, to act as a watchman for John Singleton. The application of A. C. V. Tipton for a special’s star was denied, because he was but 19 years old, the chief explained.

Policeman T. F. Rico was given a five days’ leave of absence.

The investigation of charges against Policeman Murray, made by J. D. Bethune, will be held at the next board meeting, next Tuesday morning, W. W. Weldeman will be Murray’s counsel.

This story first appeared here on Medium.

In 1918, The Salvation Army was at the height of its international popularity. Its war work during the Great War (WWI) was exemplary and recognized by governments across the globe. United States National Commander Evangeline Booth received the Distinguished Service medal from General John J. Pershing for all of the work that The Salvation Army did in France. The combat was soon to shift to an unseen enemy. The Great War had prepared The Salvation Army for a new challenge.

The Spanish flu was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic. Lasting from January 1918 to December 1920, it is considered one of the deadliest epidemics in human history.

In New York, Lillian Wald, a pioneer nurse, called for help and The Salvation Army answered. Wald mobilized a multitude of nurses, organizations, church groups, municipal bureaucracies, civic entities, and social agencies into a Nurses’ Emergency Council. The group assembled volunteer nurses and enlisted women who could support them by answering phones, accompanying nurses and doctors on home visits, and arranging for and driving automobiles to carry linens, pneumonia jackets, and quarts of soup.

Homeless shelters became makeshift hospitals and new cleanliness protocols were enforced. The Salvation Army had always believed that “cleanliness is next to Godliness,” but a new emphasis was placed on disinfecting the crowded city shelters.

The Salvation Army also began food distribution to the poorest of families in the major centers of operation, like New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco. The “war work” continued as thousands of AEF soldiers began returning home from France. Many were crowded into temporary camps and the flu swept through the ranks. Salvation Army personnel wrote letters home, served coffee and doughnuts, helped nurse sick men, cleaned hospitals, and provided encouragement to the soldiers. Naturally, Salvationists (Salvation Army church members) offered to pray and read the Bible to those in the hospital.

Like most flu strains, the Spanish flu quickly mutated, and illness levels dropped dramatically in 1919 and 1920. The “roaring twenties” had begun and people soon forgot about the flu epidemic. It wasn’t until the 1990s when new flu strains began to affect the world population that interest in the Spanish flu was revived.

Through it all, The Salvation Army served and continues to serve suffering humanity throughout the world.

The post The 1918-1920 Spanish Flu appeared first on War Cry.

From General Evangeline Booth’s 1934 address:

It is the yearning and passionate desire of my soul, that at this time, when the world is ripped by hatred, fearful of wars and revolutions, and cast down by depressions, that The Salvation Army shall go forth, again and again, holding up the compassionate Christ of the Cross, whose alone we are. And that there shall be no hesitancy because of hard obstacles, but courageous, and fearless, with our trust in Him, we shall hold Him up, to the people of the world, of whom he shall draw all men unto Him.

Click here to learn more about General Evangeline Booth. 

Tiffany is a hard-working, independent mother who has been providing for herself and her family since her ex-husband left her and their two children while she was 4 months pregnant with their third child.

“I found myself alone with no friends and family to help,” says Tiffany. “I was behind on my rent and facing food insecurity.” That’s when she found The Salvation Army.

The Salvation Army helped Tiffany with financial support in order to keep a roof over her family’s heads, utility support, food from our pantry, and other wrap-around services.

“As a single mother, my biggest concern was providing stability for my family, and The Salvation Army is the biggest part of my support system, hands down.”

Nowadays, The Salvation Army is working with Tiffany’s family through our Pathway of Hope program, which provides individualized services to families with children who desire to take action to break the cycle of poverty.

“I get really emotional when I think about it because The Salvation Army has helped me so much,” she says. “So if you are reading this I want to thank you. Because of your donation I was able to keep a roof over my family’s head and food in our house.”

TneeshaTneeshia enrolled in The Salvation Army’s Pathway of Hope program just before the COVID-19 pandemic struck. Her goal was to find housing for herself and her two-year-old son and start her path toward earning her GED.

“By early March, me and my son had moved into an apartment, and I was taking in-person GED classes,” said Tneeshia.

Unfortunately, Tneeshia’s efforts to obtain her high school diploma were jeopardized when a government stay-at-home order forced her to stay in her apartment without daycare. This put her in the difficult position of juggling online schooling and caring for her toddler.

A local Salvation Army employee called Tneeshia regularly and delivered food to her home along with household items such as a bathroom set and dishes, encouraging her not to give up.

A few weeks ago, Tneeshia earned enough credits to obtain her high school diploma. Her next goals are to find a job and daycare and to obtain a driver’s license.

On the first Friday in June, Americans celebrate the goodness that is donuts. But did you know that National Donut Day actually has its roots in doing good?

The Salvation Army in Chicago celebrated the first National Donut Day in 1938 to help those in need during the Great Depression and to commemorate the work of the “Donut Lassies,” who served donuts to soldiers during World War I.

In 1917, The Salvation Army began a mission to provide spiritual and emotional support for U.S. soldiers fighting in France during World War I. About 250 volunteers traveled overseas and set up small huts near the front lines where they could give soldiers clothes, supplies, and, of course, baked goods.

Despite discovering that serving baked goods would be difficult considering the conditions of the huts and the limited rations, two officers – Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance – began frying donuts in a small pan. These tasty treats boosted morale and won the hearts of many soldiers.

Donut Lassie Girl WWI 3

 

Nicknamed “Donut Lassies,” the women who served donuts to troops are often credited with popularizing the donut in the United States when the troops (nicknamed “Doughboys”) returned home from war.

The donut now serves as a symbol of the comfort that The Salvation Army provides to those in need through its many social services programs. The Salvation Army still serves donuts, in addition to warm meals and hydration, to those in need during times of disaster.

National Donut Day is held annually on the first Friday in June, and The Salvation Army celebrates the work of the original Donut Lassies by delivering donuts to those in need and to donut lovers across the country.

The original recipe from the front lines:

Ingredients:

  • 2 large eggs
  • 5 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 5 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 tablespoon salt
  • 1 3/4 cups milk
  • 1 tub lard

Directions:

  • Combine all ingredients (except for lard) to make the dough.
  • Thoroughly knead the dough, roll smooth, and cut into rings that are less than 1/4 inch thick.
  • Drop the rings into the lard, making sure the fat is hot enough to brown the donuts gradually. Turn the donuts slowly several times.
  • When browned, remove donuts and allow excess fat to drip off.
  • Dust with powdered sugar. Let cool and enjoy!

Lynette and her six children found themselves homeless after leaving a domestic-violence situation. She found a temporary home at The Salvation Army.

“They just poured out more love into them and into me. When I first came, I was a wreck. I was exhausted mentally, physically, emotionally, and slowly and surely, I’m rebuilding myself, one day at a time,” she said.

“Right now I’m in a year-long program called Pathway of Hope . . . I feel free, I feel like I’m ready to live. I’m homeless, we’re displaced, and I am the happiest that I’ve been in probably 10 years.”

To find out more about The Salvation Army’s Pathway of Hope program, click here.

92555022_10222595900949963_728006147902013440_n landscape pasco county floridaThe Salvation Army of Pasco County (New Port Richey, Florida) is doing its part in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic through making face masks for local medical personnel, first responders, essential business employees, and those in their domestic violence shelter.

“We quickly began to realize that masks were greatly needed in our community by those that so tirelessly care for us every day, as well as the most vulnerable that we serve,” says Major Shannon Winters, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving Pasco County. “While many agencies in our area were able to fill in gaps in other areas of need, this need was left unmet.”

Masks have been provided to hospital and NICU nurses, hospice care providers, the local Sheriff’s office, bank tellers, mail carriers, domestic violence shelter residents, and the elderly. They have also partnered with the local homeless coalition to distribute face masks to homeless individuals across the county.

“We knew that we couldn’t cure COVID-19, but we could help ‘flatten the curve’ in our community if we could help provide face masks to those that needed them.” 92242922_10222596039953438_8050081306249265152_n pasco county florida

The group of makers started out as Salvation Army employees making them during their lunch breaks but has since grown to members of their women’s ministry program as word began to spread about the project.

“As this is an activity that they could safely participate in from a distance, and even from home, it helps volunteers contribute to our service to the community.”

The Salvation Army of Pasco County also offers utility assistance to those impacted by the economic climate, as well as the life-saving service of shelter to survivors of domestic violence and their dependents.

“While it has been said that we are all ‘safer at home,’ to victims of domestic violence, this is not always true. By offering safe shelter and assistance with all human needs, victims are not forced to choose between safety from COVID-19 and safety from abuse,” says Winters.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s response to COVID-19 in Florida.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

92204845_10222595901349973_1023826693338431488_n pasco county florida

General Brian Peddle, International leader of The Salvation Army, has issued a global call to pray for women and girls in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which identified 12 critical areas of concern for women and girls.

“I’m asking you to join me in a cry for justice,” said Peddle in a special video message. “A heartfelt longing to deal with the wrongs of this world.”

In the video, Peddle describes “probably the greatest injustice of our age”: the fact that half the world’s population start life at a disadvantage simply because they are female.

In his call to prayer, Peddle cites up-to-date statistics that illustrate the scale of the issue: 71 percent of all trafficked people are female. A third of all women and girls experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime. Women do three times more unpaid care work than men – currently valued at $10 trillion USD per year.

“But even that huge number,” said Peddle, “still doesn’t capture the full extent of women’s lost economic potential.”

Spearheaded by The Salvation Army’s International Social Justice Commission (ISJC), the year of prayer will also include practical action. The Commission on the Status of Women, held at the United Nations’ New York headquarters from March 9-20, will include reports on The Salvation Army’s ministry with women and girls.

The Salvation Army is also leading or hosting a rich series of parallel events for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other stakeholders. These include coordinating sessions entitled “The Girl Child,” “Sisters for Sale” and “Women in Power” as well as hosting discussions at the ISJC headquarters run by other NGOs, such as “Using Data to Drive Inclusion and Accountability in Technology” (AnitaB.org), “Empowerment of Refugee Girls Through a Network of Education Opportunities” (Embrace Relief) and “Shoulder to Shoulder: Men and boys supporting women and girls to achieve gender equality” (28 Too Many).

The ISJC has added resources to its website on “How to Pray for Justice” and “Women and the Sustainable Development Goals” from UN Women, in order to help focus and inform prayers.

Participants are encouraged to sign up to show their support. An online discussion space invites those who pray to share how God is speaking to them, how they are responding and to share any Bible verses or other resources that others may find helpful.

“As we seek justice together, we do so in the knowledge that Jesus promised that, for those who cry out to him day and night, God will see that they get justice,” General Peddle said in his video message. “Not only that, but he told his followers that God will grant this justice quickly. So don’t wait! Sign up now and join me in this wave of prayer that will sweep around the globe.”

Watch the General’s video message, find out more and get involved at http://sar.my/cryforjustice.

Today, women are speaking up for themselves and others in a way they haven’t in decades. We’re seeing empowerment in the workplace, an increase in public service, and push-back against harassment and assault. We are rejoicing in a new collective voice showcasing strong, intelligent and passionate women.

Historically, many organizations have not encouraged leadership by women, but this was never the case with The Salvation Army. From the beginning, The Salvation Army has empowered women to advocate for and serve the most vulnerable in our world. As we celebrate Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8th), we’d like to highlight a few exemplary women who have made a difference, with The Salvation Army backing their charge.

Catherine Booth

Catherine Booth (pictured above) was the co-founder of The Salvation Army with her husband William Booth. Together they created the organization to serve those most in need and often forgotten or shunned by society. Catherine advocated for a woman’s right to preach, writing Female Ministry, which argued for a woman’s right to share the gospel, using Bible passages that supported equality.

She is also well regarded for her commitment to social reform – most notably fighting for better working conditions and pay for women. She is affectionately known by Salvationists as “The Army Mother.”

 


Evangeline Booth

Evangeline Booth

Evangeline Booth was the seventh of eight children born to General William Booth and his wife, Catherine. She grew up in The Salvation Army, helping her parents spread the mission of the Army. Booth was so strong that she was often sent wherever there was opposition to The Salvation Army or their work was threatened. Her father, General Booth, was often quoted as saying “Send Eva!”

During the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Evangeline led a mass open-air meeting in New York’s Union Square, where she raised more than $12,000 to support relief workers. She also committed hundreds of volunteers to support first responders and survivors in the wake of the earthquake.

In 1917, Evangeline sent 250 Salvation Army volunteers to France’s front lines during World War I to provide comfort and aid to soldiers. The volunteers started frying pastry dough in soldiers’ helmets and distributing doughnuts. Hence, the famous Doughnut Lassies were born.

In 1934, Evangeline was elected General by the High Council; becoming the first woman to lead the international organization. Under her leadership, The Salvation Army expanded its services, establishing hospitals for unwed mothers, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, and homes for aging adults.

 


The Doughnut Lassies

The Doughnut Lassies

In the midst of WWI, Evangeline Booth sent 250 Salvation Army volunteers overseas to support the US soldiers fighting in France. There, they set up small huts located near the front lines to give soldiers clothes, supplies and baked goods. The Doughnut Lassies began frying donuts in soldiers’ helmets. The tasty treats boosted morale and won the hearts of the soldiers.

In addition to serving fresh-fried pastries, Doughnut Lassies provided spiritual aid and comfort. They were a link home to family and friends. Their work on the front lines was rekindled during World War II. Today, the Army honors the Doughnut Lassies efforts by celebrating Donut Days annually in June.

 

 

 


Eliza Shirley

Eliza Shirley

Eliza Shirley pioneered the establishment of The Salvation Army in the United States. Born in England, she dedicated herself to The Salvation Army at 16 years of age. The following year, her father informed her they were moving to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. So Eliza approached General William Booth for his endorsement and guidance to share the Army’s message across the ocean. He warned Eliza that new faiths were often unwelcome and to prepare herself for a tough journey.

Upon arrival in Philadelphia in 1879, Eliza and her family’s efforts to start The Salvation Army in the US were mostly met with anger and disdain. Crowds often threw mud, stones, vegetables and more. Their first meeting was with only 12 people; and about a month afterward, the lot where they held their meeting was on fire. The flames drew a large crowd, and Eliza bravely embraced the opportunity to sing and preach.

Soon Eliza found a new meeting place and the work of The Salvation Army in the United States began. By the following year, she sent word to General Booth back in England requesting additional support. In response, General Booth dispatched Commissioner George Scott Railton with seven women officers (the Hallelujah Lassies). Within three years, the demand for The Salvation Army had grown so that the group were sent to open additional corps community centers.

 


Mabel Broome

Mabel Broome

In 1915 in Chicago, Mabel Broome became the first African American to become an officer in The Salvation Army. She led the charge to break the color line and reinforced the Army’s commitment to give leadership roles to women. Broome was one of the first “slum sisters” – female officers who went into a city’s poorest neighborhoods and attended to people’s most basic needs. Read more of her story here.

 

 

 

 

 


Making History Today

Making History Today

Today, The Salvation Army has many influential women leading the charge to serve our most vulnerable neighbors. We’ve had several women who served as Generals and divisional commanders. Our officers and program directors speak at local, national and international conferences on service, homelessness, human trafficking, and so much more.

They serve on the front lines of the Fight for Good every day bringing love and compassion to those who need hope.

 

 

 

 


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The post Five Women Who Shaped Salvation Army History appeared first on War Cry.