General Peddle

General Brian Peddle, International leader of The Salvation Army, has issued a global call to pray for women and girls in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which identified 12 critical areas of concern for women and girls.

“I’m asking you to join me in a cry for justice,” said Peddle in a special video message. “A heartfelt longing to deal with the wrongs of this world.”

In the video, Peddle describes “probably the greatest injustice of our age”: the fact that half the world’s population start life at a disadvantage simply because they are female.

In his call to prayer, Peddle cites up-to-date statistics that illustrate the scale of the issue: 71 percent of all trafficked people are female. A third of all women and girls experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime. Women do three times more unpaid care work than men – currently valued at $10 trillion USD per year.

“But even that huge number,” said Peddle, “still doesn’t capture the full extent of women’s lost economic potential.”

Spearheaded by The Salvation Army’s International Social Justice Commission (ISJC), the year of prayer will also include practical action. The Commission on the Status of Women, held at the United Nations’ New York headquarters from March 9-20, will include reports on The Salvation Army’s ministry with women and girls.

The Salvation Army is also leading or hosting a rich series of parallel events for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other stakeholders. These include coordinating sessions entitled “The Girl Child,” “Sisters for Sale” and “Women in Power” as well as hosting discussions at the ISJC headquarters run by other NGOs, such as “Using Data to Drive Inclusion and Accountability in Technology” (AnitaB.org), “Empowerment of Refugee Girls Through a Network of Education Opportunities” (Embrace Relief) and “Shoulder to Shoulder: Men and boys supporting women and girls to achieve gender equality” (28 Too Many).

The ISJC has added resources to its website on “How to Pray for Justice” and “Women and the Sustainable Development Goals” from UN Women, in order to help focus and inform prayers.

Participants are encouraged to sign up to show their support. An online discussion space invites those who pray to share how God is speaking to them, how they are responding and to share any Bible verses or other resources that others may find helpful.

“As we seek justice together, we do so in the knowledge that Jesus promised that, for those who cry out to him day and night, God will see that they get justice,” General Peddle said in his video message. “Not only that, but he told his followers that God will grant this justice quickly. So don’t wait! Sign up now and join me in this wave of prayer that will sweep around the globe.”

Watch the General’s video message, find out more and get involved at http://sar.my/cryforjustice.

Today, women are speaking up for themselves and others in a way they haven’t in decades. We’re seeing empowerment in the workplace, an increase in public service, and push-back against harassment and assault. We are rejoicing in a new collective voice showcasing strong, intelligent and passionate women.

Historically, many organizations have not encouraged leadership by women, but this was never the case with The Salvation Army. From the beginning, The Salvation Army has empowered women to advocate for and serve the most vulnerable in our world. As we celebrate Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8th), we’d like to highlight a few exemplary women who have made a difference, with The Salvation Army backing their charge.

Catherine Booth

Catherine Booth (pictured above) was the co-founder of The Salvation Army with her husband William Booth. Together they created the organization to serve those most in need and often forgotten or shunned by society. Catherine advocated for a woman’s right to preach, writing Female Ministry, which argued for a woman’s right to share the gospel, using Bible passages that supported equality.

She is also well regarded for her commitment to social reform – most notably fighting for better working conditions and pay for women. She is affectionately known by Salvationists as “The Army Mother.”

 


Evangeline Booth

Evangeline Booth

Evangeline Booth was the seventh of eight children born to General William Booth and his wife, Catherine. She grew up in The Salvation Army, helping her parents spread the mission of the Army. Booth was so strong that she was often sent wherever there was opposition to The Salvation Army or their work was threatened. Her father, General Booth, was often quoted as saying “Send Eva!”

During the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Evangeline led a mass open-air meeting in New York’s Union Square, where she raised more than $12,000 to support relief workers. She also committed hundreds of volunteers to support first responders and survivors in the wake of the earthquake.

In 1917, Evangeline sent 250 Salvation Army volunteers to France’s front lines during World War I to provide comfort and aid to soldiers. The volunteers started frying pastry dough in soldiers’ helmets and distributing doughnuts. Hence, the famous Doughnut Lassies were born.

In 1934, Evangeline was elected General by the High Council; becoming the first woman to lead the international organization. Under her leadership, The Salvation Army expanded its services, establishing hospitals for unwed mothers, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, and homes for aging adults.

 


The Doughnut Lassies

The Doughnut Lassies

In the midst of WWI, Evangeline Booth sent 250 Salvation Army volunteers overseas to support the US soldiers fighting in France. There, they set up small huts located near the front lines to give soldiers clothes, supplies and baked goods. The Doughnut Lassies began frying donuts in soldiers’ helmets. The tasty treats boosted morale and won the hearts of the soldiers.

In addition to serving fresh-fried pastries, Doughnut Lassies provided spiritual aid and comfort. They were a link home to family and friends. Their work on the front lines was rekindled during World War II. Today, the Army honors the Doughnut Lassies efforts by celebrating Donut Days annually in June.

 

 

 


Eliza Shirley

Eliza Shirley

Eliza Shirley pioneered the establishment of The Salvation Army in the United States. Born in England, she dedicated herself to The Salvation Army at 16 years of age. The following year, her father informed her they were moving to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. So Eliza approached General William Booth for his endorsement and guidance to share the Army’s message across the ocean. He warned Eliza that new faiths were often unwelcome and to prepare herself for a tough journey.

Upon arrival in Philadelphia in 1879, Eliza and her family’s efforts to start The Salvation Army in the US were mostly met with anger and disdain. Crowds often threw mud, stones, vegetables and more. Their first meeting was with only 12 people; and about a month afterward, the lot where they held their meeting was on fire. The flames drew a large crowd, and Eliza bravely embraced the opportunity to sing and preach.

Soon Eliza found a new meeting place and the work of The Salvation Army in the United States began. By the following year, she sent word to General Booth back in England requesting additional support. In response, General Booth dispatched Commissioner George Scott Railton with seven women officers (the Hallelujah Lassies). Within three years, the demand for The Salvation Army had grown so that the group were sent to open additional corps community centers.

 


Mabel Broome

Mabel Broome

In 1915 in Chicago, Mabel Broome became the first African American to become an officer in The Salvation Army. She led the charge to break the color line and reinforced the Army’s commitment to give leadership roles to women. Broome was one of the first “slum sisters” – female officers who went into a city’s poorest neighborhoods and attended to people’s most basic needs. Read more of her story here.

 

 

 

 

 


Making History Today

Making History Today

Today, The Salvation Army has many influential women leading the charge to serve our most vulnerable neighbors. We’ve had several women who served as Generals and divisional commanders. Our officers and program directors speak at local, national and international conferences on service, homelessness, human trafficking, and so much more.

They serve on the front lines of the Fight for Good every day bringing love and compassion to those who need hope.

 

 

 

 


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The post Five Women Who Shaped Salvation Army History appeared first on War Cry.

Catherine Booth (1829-1890), the co-founder of The Salvation Army, talks about achieving true peace, how our hearts can be made perfect, and what a Christian can learn from one of Napoleon’s soldiers.

  • None of our hearts are born perfect by nature, but they can be renewed to be made perfect. For this, first, a heart must be loyal to God. It should be thoroughly given to Him, irrespective of consequences. Second, a heart must be obedient. A perfect heart does not pick and choose which commandments to obey. Hearts that do so are partial, not perfect. Third, at the root of all perfect hearts, is trust. Look no further than Abraham to see a heart perfect in its trust. Abraham believed God almost to the blood of his son Isaac, and God showed Himself strong in his behalf.
  • Our charity must be divine and focused on the soul. Sentiments of pity and acts of generosity towards man is sometimes done all without a spark of divinity in one’s heart. Or worse, it may be simply done to merit one’s own eternal life. Those are examples of nothing but false charity; they begin in self and end on earth. Are we more concerned about relieving temporal distress, in others and in us, than we are about feeding famished souls? Divine charity, such as when Christ fed both the spirit and the hunger of His followers, realizes the value of looking after the soul.
  • Peace is the universal want of man, but true peace is not simply a state of mere quietness or insensibility. True peace only arises out of a reconciliation with God. Where there is sin, there is conflict and misery. God Himself cannot give peace to a soul holding on to sin. But when one confesses and forsakes their sins and casts their guilty soul on Jesus, then He will give that soul true, divine peace. It will abide forever.
  • It is said that one of Napoleon’s men, while being operated on for the extraction of a bullet, exclaimed, “Cut a little deeper, and you will find my general’s name.” Napoleon’s name was engraved on that soldier’s heart. As God’s soldiers, the image and glory of Christ must be engraved on our hearts as well. It is what Jesus Christ demands of us. We must be thoroughly committed to His side; there can be no neutrals in spiritual warfare.
  • Here is great encouragement for those of us who suffer from doubt. Faith, as it is described in the Scriptures, is a voluntary thing. I have known sincere and honest souls whose minds are tormented with doubt, but whose hearts have still inquired about God’s love and truth. I have more sympathy towards them than with those who would profess all and do nothing. God believes in man’s honesty and sincerity. If you are sincere in your heart, He will not abandon you.

Women assume the role of president at prestigious Christian colleges around the country. by Retta Blaney
With a sense that they have been called, and with an appreciation for the groundbreaking role they are assuming, women have been taking over the leadership of Christian colleges and universities in slowly increasing numbers. Religious schools still lag far behind secular institutions in the appointing of female presidents, but the ceiling has been broken in schools across the country that were established in the holiness tradition.
“The idea has been that only one population, gender or ethnicity makes all the decisions,” said Deana L. Porterfield, who in 2014 became the first female president of Roberts Wesleyan College and Northeastern Seminary in Rochester, N.Y. “We’re better when we’re diverse. I do believe it’s what God’s calling us to do. Full representation is important if you really believe all are made in the image of God.”
While being the first woman president is an hono..