FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Media Contact:

Wonetha Hall
Public Relations Coordinator
Salvation Army Tampa Area Command
Phone number (248) 802-9843
Wonetha.Hall@uss.salvationarmy.org

 

“CHRISTMAS IN JULY” HAPPENING AT AMALIE ARENA SATURDAY, JULY 16, 2016 AT THE TAMPA BAY STORM –VS- PHILADELPHIA SOUL GAME TO BENEFIT
THE SALVATION ARMY

Bring a new, unwrapped toy to the game to help make the spirit of Christmas a reality for children and families in need.

 

 

TAMPA, Fla. (July 16, 2016) – It’s hard to think of “Christmas” in July but that’s exactly what the Salvation Army and Tampa Bay Storm want you to do on Saturday, July 16th! Fans donating a new, unwrapped toy at the Tampa Bay Storm vs. Philadelphia Souls game will receive a free ticket to the game! That’s right! The Storm will give away 1 ticket per toy donated! (Maximum of 4 tickets per person)

 

Why now? The Salvation Army needs your help! This head-start will allow the registration of more needy families for the Angel Tree program. Each Christmas, the Salvation Army provides over 17,000 toys to needy children across the Tampa Bay area.  This volunteer – led tradition has been serving our community for over 37 years. Toys donated in July will make it possible for The Salvation Army to add more families to the Angel Tree registry in the coming months.

 

The TB Storm, CHASE and ABC Action News are hosting the toy drive during the pre-game party on the plaza of Amalie Arena! Local celebrities will be on-site collecting the toys for the Salvation Army and distributing game tickets to donating fans!  Big surprises are also planned during the game!  Bring the entire family for an unforgettable afternoon!

“There is no better gift than the one that is given from the heart” said Tampa Area Commander Captain Dr. Andrew Miller.  “By faith we believe in what is not seen, and by choice we act on this faith by helping our neighbors in need and building a stronger, more compassionate community.”

 

“For more than 20 years, viewers and employees at ABC Action News have adopted angels” said Director of Community Affairs Lissette Campos. “To see a child ask for bed sheets, along with a toy is a wake-up call.  Without Angel Tree, these children would have nothing on Christmas morning.”

 

To learn more about the Salvation Army Tampa Area Command Angel Tree program, please contact our Angel Tree Coordinator, Jessica Vick at 813-549-0636.

 

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About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 150 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information on the Tampa Area Command, go to www.salvationarmytampa.org.

June 13, 2016
Kevin Smith | kevin.smith@uss.salvationarmy.org

“Our mobile kitchen served throughout the night with water and coffee available to any responders or passersby,”  said Major Ted Morris, The Salvation Army Orlando Area Commander.  “We will continue to support responders and families with the generosity of our local community partners.   This morning, more restaurants arrived with breakfast foods and although we are grateful, we may have more than we need at this location.”

The Salvation Army is asking any commercial food vendors that are interested in supporting to please coordinate by calling The Salvation Army of Orlando at 407-423-8581.

The Salvation Army mobile kitchens, better known as canteens, prepare year round for natural disasters like hurricanes and tornados, but this week our volunteer teams have been called to action to serve along side our first responders in this time of tragedy.

“We ask everyone to join us in praying for those that have been affected by this attack,” Morris said.  “Our teams will continue to serve in coordination with emergency management and our partner organizations.”

If you are interested in supporting these efforts, please log on to our website at www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org or call 800-SAL-ARMY.   Those interested in becoming members of our disaster response team can register online or simply gain more information about The Salvation Army’s response to this tragic event.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to carry out those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.
Orlando, Fla – Sunday morning, Salvation Army disaster relief teams arrived on scene at Orange Avenue near the Orange Regional Medical Center providing food and hydration to responders.   Dinner was provided in partnership with generous restaurants like Olive Garden and Buffalo Wild Wings.

June 12, 2016

Kevin Smith | kevin.smith@uss.salvationarmy.org

Original post link: https://disaster.salvationarmyusa.org/news/2016/06/12/salvation-army-responds-to-tragedy-in-orlando

Orlando, Florida – June 12, 2016 – The Salvation Army Orlando Disaster Relief team activated its mobile kitchen to support emergency responders with hydration and meals. Major Ted Morris, Orlando Area Commander is working with local officials and offering additional support as needed. Emotional and Spiritual Care teams have been placed on standby to support the Central Florida Community deal with this horrific tragedy.

“We were awakened this morning to this tragic news in Orlando. Our local disaster team members immediately reached out to ask how they could help their neighbors. This is why we train, this is why our volunteers serve and today we are here to comfort those impacted across our community.” stated Major Ted Morris. “Right now as we respond with hydration and food, we ask everyone to join us in praying for those families who lost dear loved ones and those who struggle to recover in hospitals around our area.”

Salvation Army units around Florida have been placed on standby to support families and responders as needed. We encourage those in the Central Florida area to check in with family and friends to establish that they are safe and well.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to carry out those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

Media Contact:
Dulcinea Cuellar Kimrey
Division Communications Director
Salvation Army of Florida
(813) 340-8465
Dulcinea_Cuellar@uss.salvationarmy.org

The Salvation Army of Florida Responds to Tropical Storm Colin

Resources and Manpower on stand-by in the Tampa Bay area and Florida panhandle

 

Lutz, Fla. (June 6,2016) – Just days into Hurricane Season 2016, The Salvation Army in Florida is on standby and prepared to serve and assist with the impact of Tropical Storm Colin.

Salvation Army personnel on Florida’s west coast are preparing to respond to Tropical Storm Colin as it begins to batter the Tampa Bay area and skirt toward northeast Florida and Georgia.

Currently, The Salvation Army has its Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater canteens (or kitchen on wheels) on standby waiting for the OK from emergency personnel to begin the work of assisting those in need. Canteens along the west coast of Florida, including the Florida Panhandle are also on standby.

“The Salvation Army is ready and willing to be of service,” said Major James Hall, area commander for The Salvation Army of Tampa. “We will continue to be in communication with our emergency management personnel across the bay area so we can be of the best service to our communities when needed.”

Just a few weeks ago, The Salvation Army’s Pinellas Team participated in Pinellas County’s Emergency Management’s Hurricane Exercise, demonstrating the county and the Army’s commitment to be ready in situations such as this. Last summer in the wake of local record flooding, The Salvation Army was called upon by the Pasco County Emergency Operations Center to serve meals out of the Army’s mobile canteens. In addition, the Army deployed a shower unit and distributed clean up kits to neighborhoods throughout Pasco County.

Relief efforts will extend throughout the impacted region. In the short-term aftermath of the storm, Salvation Army officers and staff will focus primarily on immediate needs providing food, hydration and emotional and spiritual care to impacted individuals and families.

The best way to help survivors and relief workers is to make a financial contribution. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors.

The Salvation Army asks people who want to help those affected by Tropical Storm Colin
to visit www.salvationarmyusa.org or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769). Donors may also contribute $10 via their phone bill by text messaging the word Storm to 80888, and confirming the donation with the word, “Yes.” Checks may be made out to The Salvation Army Disaster Relief, PO BOX 1959 Atlanta, GA 30301.

• A $10 donation feeds a disaster survivor for one day
• A $30 donation provides one food box, containing staple foods for a family of four, or one household cleanup kit, containing brooms, mops, buckets and other cleaning supplies
• A $100 donation can serve snacks and drinks for 125 survivors and emergency personnel at the scene of a disaster
• A $250 donation can provide one hot meal to 100 people or keep a hydration station operational for 24 hours
• A $500 donation keeps a Salvation Army canteen (mobile feeding unit) fully operational for one day

At this point, in-kind donations are not being accepted. Used clothing and used furniture are seldom required during an incident. However, these gifts are vitally important in supporting the day-to-day work of your local Salvation Army. Please consider giving these items to your local Salvation Army Family Store or dial 1-800-SA-TRUCK (1-800-728-7825).

For the latest emergency disaster services news, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org and follow the EDS team on Twitter @SalArmyEDS. Interested parties may also visit www.salvationarmyflorida.com, www.facebook.com/salvationarmyflorida and follow @salarmyfla on Twitter.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

If you’re a fan of the crispy, sweet confection known as the donut, you have Salvation Army Adjutant Helen Purviance and her crew of “Donut Lassies” to thank.

Helen, her comrade Ensign Margaret Sheldon, and nearly 250 other lassies delivered kindness to WWI soliders on the front lines in France by mending their uniforms, playing music on the Victrola, handing out writing tablets, and distributing chocolate bars and other confections.

Adjutant Helen Purcviance, credited with introducing the donut to American servicemen during WWI.

Adjutant Helen Purcviance, credited with introducing the donut to American servicemen during WWI.

What’s the connection to donuts, you ask?

In the opening pages of his book, Donuts: An American Passion, food historian John T. Edge explains:
“At a time when the Salvation Army was searching for ways to brand itself as American, operatives in World War I France seized upon the donut. Soon, comely Salvationists in tin hats were smiling for the cameras and tending vats of roiling lard. As they dipped donuts for their boys, they dispensed motherhood. By the close of World War I, the Salvation Army was among the strongest charitable forces in America — and their chosen totem, the donut, was an ingrained symbol of home.”

Those “comely Salvationists in tin hats” were none other than Helen Purviance, Margaret Sheldon, and the other lassies!

Donut Lassies dispensing deep-fried comfort on the front lines of WWI.

Donut Lassies dispensing deep-fried comfort on the front lines of WWI.

Here’s how Edge describes the action:

“Though contemporary accounts differ as to how and why, there is no doubt that their decision to fry donuts would transform fried dough from a vaguely foreign food, loosely associated with the Dutch, into a symbol of American home and hearth, a gustatory manifestation of the ideals for which the soldiers fought…One account has the Lassies frying the first batches in a galvanized trash can; another says it was a soldier’s helmet. No matter the variation in the telling of the tale, there can be no doubt that in a very short time donuts became central to The Salvation Army ministry.”
In this unedited letter home to her family, Helen tells them what a typical — and grueling — day was like for her and for the other lassies:
“At 8 we commence to serve cocoa and coffee and make pies and doughnuts, cup cakes and fry eggs and make all kinds of eats until it is all you can see. Well can you think of two women cooking in one day 2,500 doughnuts, eight dozen cup cakes, fifty pies, 800 pan cakes and 225 gallons of cocoa, and one other girl serving it. That is a day’s work in my last hut. Then meeting at night, and it lasts for two hours.”

Adjutant Helen Purviance, credited with introducing the donut to American servicemen during WWI.

Since 1938, The Salvation Army has celebrated Adjutant Helen Purviance and her smiling contingent of donut-frying lassies with National Donut Day on the first Friday in June — this year it’s on Friday, June 3.

National Donut Day was originally started by The Salvation Army in Chicago to honor the donut lassies, but also to raise funding to help care for the men and women struggling through the Great Depression.

On June 3, you can eat a donut (or two!) knowing that you’re not just enjoying a delicious piece of WWI history, you’re honoring the brave US soldiers who fought for victory, and the lassies who freely dispensed deep-fried comfort.

About author John T. Edge:
John T. Donut-Day-1Edge’s work has appeared regularly in Gourmet and Saveur and has been featured in the 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2004 editions of Best Food Writing. He is currently the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi. His cookbook, A Gracious Plenty, was nominated for a James Beard Foundation Award. In 2003, he was named “One of Twenty Southerners to Watch” by the Financial Times of London, and he was a finalist for the 2004 M. F. K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award from the James Beard Foundation.

Congratulations to Dotti Groover-Skipper, The Florida Divisional Anti-Trafficking Coordinator for The Salvation Army!!

Dotti-Community-Hero-2-16

Tuesday, 02.23.2016 / 8:00 PM ET / News
Tampa Bay Lightning

TAMPA BAY – The Tampa Bay Lightning honored Dotti Groover-Skipper as the 32nd Lightning Community Hero of the 2015-16 season during the first period of tonight’s game versus the Arizona Coyotes. Groover-Skipper, who received a $50,000 donation from the Lightning Foundation and the Lightning Community Heroes program, will donate the money to Underground Network.

Tonight’s community hero has served the Tampa Bay area tirelessly for over 30 years. Groover-Skipper has formed several coalitions in order to quietly serve those who have been affected by addiction, sexual exploitation and human trafficking. One of the coalitions, The FREE Network, has been at the forefront by assisting law enforcement with victims while educating communities on labor, sex and organ trafficking.

Her time and energy towards this cause has heightened awareness of human trafficking throughout various communities to ensure education amongst local youth. She wishes to leave a legacy of safe communites and vows that Tampa Bay is a no tolerance zone for the exploitation of all forms of human trafficking.

Groover-Skipper becomes the 211th Lightning Community Hero since Jeff and Penny Vinik introduced the program in 2011-12 with a $10 million, five-season commitment to the Tampa Bay community. Through this evening’s game, in total, the Lightning Foundation has granted $10.7 million to more than 300 different non-profits in the Greater Tampa Bay area.

Written by: Kevin Smith
kevin.smith@uss.salvationarmy.org

Penscaola, FL (February 24, 2016) – The Salvation Army of Pensacola were staging cots and blankets on their gymnasium floor as early as 10:00 am on Tuesday preparing for a significant outbreak of tornadoes. In partnership with Emergency Management and local disaster relief organizations, Pensacola was ready to respond.

“Thanks to our National Weather Service partners, we knew this was going to be a big event, so we were prepared.” said Major Bob Cornett, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties.

When the Moorings apartment complex began to fail, local responders and partner agencies were ready to respond opening shelter to house those whose homes were destroyed. This morning as the sun rises, The Salvation Army will be serving hot meals and distributing bottled water that was donated by Coca Cola.

Major Cornett was quick to mention, “Coke has always been a strong partner in disaster relief with The Salvation Army. This morning our local distibutor stepped up again to help families that are trying to cope with the widespread damage to their homes and businesses.”

The Salvation Army of Pensacola was still serving the families from Century, Florida that was hit with an EF3 tornado February 15, 2016. Providing meals and hydration to responders and survivors is the first step to helping those affected by disasters. As the immediate response transitions to recovery, The Salvation Army partners to help rebuild lives and comfort families through times by providing Disaster Social Services.

Financial donations are the best way to support those affected by these devastating tornadoes. Donations can be made online at www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org, by calling 800-SAL-ARMY or by sending a check to your local Salvation Army, earmarked, Emergency Disaster Services.

While used clothing and used furniture are seldom required during disaster response, these gifts are vitally important in supporting the day-to-day work of The Salvation Army. Please consider giving these items to the local Family Store by dialing 1-800-SA-TRUCK (1-800-728-7825).

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org or follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to carry out those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

We love hearing volunteer stories!

Anthony Rizzo applied with The Salvation Army in St. Petersburg, Florida to volunteer with children in our homeless shelter. Anthony comes from Long Island, New York and works full-time for Bright Horizons Family Solutions as a teacher and community service liaison. He wanted to volunteer with our children on his only day off and the weekends.

Anthony was an immediate hit! He arrived with anticipation, enthusiasm, and bags full of crafts, books, and activities. He volunteered with our children while their mothers attended morning workshops and with children of families waiting to register for Christmas assistance. He planned and coordinated monthly activities including a barbeque and holiday activities for shelter mothers and children.

Anthony’s company establishes not-for-profit Bright Spaces for children in Shelters — “safe places for children in times of crisis.” Part of our Family Unit is designated a Bright Space but there was very little contact with the establishing center.

Part of Anthony’s job is to reconnect the establishing centers with the Bright Spaces they create in community shelters. Anthony did that for us! He made it come alive again with child care volunteers and enrichment programs. He is implementing his company’s “All Star Volunteer Program” which allows center employees to come once a month for selected activities.

Anthony began his career in child care with Boys & Girls Club in 1996. He has worked with Big Brothers Big Sisters and has been with Bright Horizons for 9 years. Anthony is single and loves to travel. “I like to be behind the scenes. I do these things because I love children and love to do what I am doing.”

One person can make an extraordinary difference and Anthony Rizzo has done so for us in a very short time.

This post was contributed by Dulcinea Cuellar, Divisional Director of Public Relations, Development at The Salvation Army Florida Divisional Headquarters

Julie Shematz was accustomed to using her body to make money. Being exploited was a way of life for her for several years.

Formerly an exotic dancer, Shematz is now the director of social services for The Salvation Army in Tampa. Today she helps other women, men and children find a way out of being trafficked and exploited.

Her story of exploitation, starting over and becoming a woman who helps others rebuild their lives is a story of God’s grace and redemption, she said.

Human trafficking is a story not everyone wants to hear or talk about.

Experts believe just talking about the problem is not enough and are calling for serious action in Tampa and around the globe.

An opportunity for hard conversations about human trafficking began when President Barack Obama designated January as Human Trafficking Awareness Month in 2012. The designation brings awareness and urges all Americans to “help healthcare workers, airline flight crews, and other professionals better identify and provide assistance to victims of trafficking.” Additionally, the designation promises that the government will “combat human trafficking, prosecute the perpetrators, and help victims recover and rebuild their lives.”

In Florida, The Salvation Army, along with its partners, have hosted a series of workshops and summits all over the state to bring awareness to human trafficking.

There are more than 21 million people enslaved in the world today – more than at any other time in history. Human trafficking is a $32 billion dollar a year industry. It generates more revenue than Apple, Ford and Exxon annually.

Florida ranks number three in the nation for the amount of calls into the National Human Trafficking Hotline number. The hotline provides confidential counseling and helps to link victims and survivors with legal and social assistance.

Experts suggest the high volume of calls to the hotline is attributed to several things: the Interstate 4 corridor which connects east and west Florida, professional sports teams and a booming tourist industry. Tampa also hosts one the largest “adult” entertainment industries in the nation, which makes the state the “perfect storm” for traffickers and their victims.

Sex trafficking exists at legal establishments like strip clubs, escort services and massage parlors. Illegal brothels and street prostitution can also traffick individuals.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, there are more adult entertainment facilities than McDonald’s in the Tampa Bay area.

For people like Shematz, the numbers are no deterrent, as she is always motivated to help the next person find freedom and a new life, she said.

Shematz runs and operates one of the few safe houses in the area.

Running a safe house at a confidential location means providing more than a safe place – it provides an environment that is cozy, comfortable and conducive to restoration. The walls are decorated with inspirational messages, beds are attractively made, and the space feels welcoming, not institutional.

Since it opened last year, 28 people, including five men, have stayed at the shelter. The shelter is designed as an initial safe place available to clients before they move to a more long-term location.

Law enforcement and Department of Homeland Security officials, judges and community members refer trafficking victims to Shematz at The Salvation Army. Oftentimes, law enforcement will find people they suspect of being trafficking victims on the streets or in illicit businesses.

The safe house’s structure is transitional. It is meant to be a temporary solution – getting survivors off the streets and away from their trafficker. After being in a the safe house, clients work with case workers help survivors make a plan for the longer-term. The next step may be moving out on their own into apartments, rehabilitation programs or other shelters.

For Mary* (not her real name), a 32 year-old mother, meeting Shematz was a blessing.

A Tampa police officer found Mary and learned she was sometimes homeless and being exploited by a boyfriend. She was referred to Shematz and stayed in the safe house for a couple of months before transitioning into a more stable environment. The safe house may be temporary, but the support is unconditional.

“This place has been a real blessing,” Mary said. “I’m not sure what I would have done without it.”
The Salvation Army works with a network of community partners to help individuals are able to get temporary shelter and more long-term services and care when they are ready.

Shematz works closely with the Tampa Police Department, the Department of Homeland Security, FREE: The Slavery Survival Network of over 100 community partners, and, of course, other facilities of The Salvation Army to provide clients the best resources available.

Dotti Groover-Skipper is The Salvation Army’s state-wide coordinator of anti-trafficking efforts. She encourages the development of strong practices in awareness and direct service efforts. She also serves on the Florida Legislative Statewide Council on Human Trafficking, an appointment made by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

Groover-Skipper first became concerned about trafficking after encountering young women and girls who had been sexually exploited when she was an NFL cheerleader.

And although sexual trafficking may seem to be a more high-profile topic, she notes that labor trafficking is more prolific than sexual trafficking.

Labor traffickers force people to work against their will in many different industries and use violence, threats, lies, debt bondage and other forms of coercion. Victims of labor trafficking frequently work long hours for little or no pay and believe they have no other choice, but to continue working for that employer.

Globally, the International Labor Organization estimates that there are 14.2 million people trapped in forced labor in industries including agriculture, construction, domestic work and manufacturing.

Less common is trafficking in human organs.

The World Health Organization estimates that at least 10,000 sales of human organs are made each year. The practice is illegal in nearly every nation, including the United States.

Organ trafficking is a crime that occurs when traffickers force or deceive their victims into giving up an organ. In addition, there are instances where vulnerable persons are treated for an ailment, which may or may not exist, and organs are removed without the victim’s consent or knowledge. Those who are most likely to be victims of organ trafficking are the poor, migrant workers, homeless and the illiterate.

The Salvation Army of Florida is sending additional teams of volunteers and canteens, or kitchens on wheels, to help assist first responders and survivors after this weekend’s record rainfall.

Along with deploying its eight-unit shower truck to the evacuation shelter at First Presbyterian Church, 7540 Ridge Road in Port Richey, The Salvation Army has also gathered more than two dozen volunteers to help.

Jeanne Coulter, social services director for the Pasco county Salvation Army, said teams will serve until the end of this week. She said she will meet with the county and other partner agencies on Friday to discuss long-term recovery. Coulter is also working with county officials who will direct The Salvation Army on when it can deliver meals to residents who have been affected by the flooding.

“I’ve lived here for 35 years and I’ve never seen flooding like this,” she said, echoing what many government officials have said. “This is my hometown and we care about our neighbors.”

Along with being stationed at the county center in Pasco county, Coulter said Salvation Army volunteers are also serving hot meals at its Center of Hope, 8040 Washington St, Port Richey.

Center of Hope offers a daily community meal, feeding 100 residents every day. Volunteers are working tirelessly not only with the community meal but with assisting first responders at the Emergency Operations Center.

“We do this because (this disaster) could have easily been you or me,” she said. “We help because we have a devotion to our community, we have a love of others and it’s in The Salvation Army’s DNA.”

The best way to help survivors and relief workers is to make a financial contribution. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors as the need continues to be assessed.

The Salvation Army asks people who want to help those affected by the flooding in the Tampa Bay Area to visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

[list type=”check”]

  • A $10 donation feeds a disaster survivor for one day
  • A $30 donation provides one food box, containing staple foods for a family of four, or one household cleanup kit, containing brooms, mops, buckets and other cleaning supplies
  • A $100 donation can serve snacks and drinks for 125 survivors and emergency personnel at the scene of a disaster
  • A $250 donation can provide one hot meal to 100 people or keep a hydration station operational for 24 hours
  • A $500 donation keeps a Salvation Army canteen (mobile feeding unit) fully operational for one day

[/list]

At this point, in-kind donations are not being accepted. Used clothing and used furniture are seldom required during an incident. However, these gifts are vitally important in supporting the day-to-day work of your local Salvation Army. Please consider giving these items to your local Salvation Army Family Store or dial 1-800-SA-TRUCK (1-800-728-7825).
For the latest emergency disaster services news, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org and follow the EDS team on Twitter @SalArmyEDS.
# # #

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.