A page from the Los Angeles Herald newspaper announcing Capt. Nellie Truelove’s commission as a member of the LAPD

On March 4, 1903, the Los Angeles Herald newspaper reported that Salvation Army Captain Nellie Truelove would be the first woman “to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority.”

Captain Nellie Truelove

Born in London in 1863, the aptly-named Capt. Truelove ran a home for “fallen” women at the turn of the 20th century in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.

The word “fallen” in those days referred to women who worked as prostitutes or were pregnant and unmarried.

Capt. Truelove’s rescue work involved spending days and nights in bars and brothels trying to ease the burden of women in trouble. She believed that no matter how dire the circumstance, there was hope for every woman she met.

Courtesy of California Digital Newspaper Collection

Often, she would be called on to referee disputes between the ladies in her care — or their clients — so the Los Angeles Police Department trusted her with the authority to keep the peace as an official member of the force.

Just one year after she received her star and billy club she died. Reportedly, among her last words were, “take care of my girls” and “it was worth it all.”

On the day of her funeral, the streets were lined with thousands of people as eight policemen led a white hearse drawn by four white horses. As her cortege passed the red light district, the bar owners and bartenders who knew her well stood outside with doors closed and hats off, out of respect.

The full article reads: 

She Wears A Star | Nellie Truelove Joins the Police Force

Salvation Lass Appointed by the Commission | May Exercise Authority at Rescue Home in East Los Angeles – Fryburg & Berkowitz Saloon License Case Ended – Police Duty at Schools

Demure little Nellie Truelove is a member of the Los Angeles police force, distinguished in that she is the first woman to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority. Nellie Truelove is used to the blue uniform and not unaccustomed to the exercise of authority, for, in addition to being a”policeman,” she is Staff Captain Nellie of The Salvation Army, in charge of the Salvation Army Rescue home on Griffith street in East Los Angeles. J. S. Slauson introduced The Salvation Army lass to Mayor Snyder; she was recommended, the mayor said, “by the best people of the city.”

When the police commission had waded through a part of the accumulation of business before it, the mayor called attention to the presence of “Staff Captain Nellie Truelove,” who asked to be clothed with police power. Commissioner Keeney wore his most cherubic smile when the blue-gowned young woman was presented. Commissioner Maglnnis, “the man from Mexico,” whose first appearance it was at a board meeting, looked as though he was glad that the mayor had given him the job.

Commissioner Lang wheeled about, so that he might be in range of the smiling but embarrassed face of the applicant for a place on the police force. The mayor, of course, was radiant. He is at his best when women are present. For instance, the other day he deliberately violated a city ordinance that he might do a woman a good turn. She called late in the afternoon to inform the mayor that a policeman had threatened her with arrest if she persisted in tooting her fish horn—the woman was a fish peddler. She said that she could not sell the fish If she might not toot the horn, and a stock on hands would be spoiled. The mayor told her to go on and blow the fish horn until her stock was sold, and if any policeman interfered, to refer him to the mayor.

Advice to Women

If you want anything from the mayor, just be a woman; he will find a way to gratify the want. When Nellie Truelove came with her unusual request, the mayor for a time was lost in doubt, but Herbert J. Goudge, the assistant city attorney, was called for counsel, and gave it as his opinion that there was nothing in the law governing the police department that forbade appointment of a woman.

Of course, she will be but a special “policeman,” her authority being confined to the rescue home, where often there are admitted women whose only fear is of a police officer. It is Impracticable to call upon the regular police every time there is a disturbance at the home, and It is not the wish of the home management to have every rebellious inmate arrested and taken to the police station.

The Fryburg & Berkowitz saloon license at 245 East First street, which has been in controversy for several weeks, was disposed of, by allowing the application for a transfer to Charles Toegel. Frank Reese asked for a continuance of one week to give Fryburg a chance to be heard. Toefcel wanted the matter settled and out of the way. His story of entering into partnership with Fryburg, as Toegel told it, was that of the innocent victim of an unscrupulous and designing lawbreaker. “After I learned that Fryburg was not what you might say an up and down honest man.” continued the speaker, he was anxious to get out of the partnership, and sold his interest in the business to the Los Angeles Brewing company.

Mayor Snyder will give paternal advice to the board of education, whose members authorized the board secretary to make a request for a. policeman who would be at all times ready to answer a call from superintendents of schools, when boys or girls became obstreperous and lost awe of the birch. The school board secretury made this pointed demand:

A Pointed Demand

“At a meeting of the board of education, held February 24, I was Instructed to communicate to you the request of the board that you detail a police officer who may be called upon at any time by the superintendents of schools, as cases very often occur where immediate action is necessary, and delays have many times occurred and the object been defeated because of there being no officer available when wanted.”

Chief of Police Elton assured the police board members that the house duty men at the police station are always available to be called to reinforce the school superintendents.

Pressman & Henry were granted a liquor license at 344 South Spring street, the license that was lost by Paul Kerkow for violation of the Sunday closing law.

J. K. Miller was allowed a transfer of his license from the Arcade station to the corner of Central and Ceres avenues. Edward Bode was made a special policeman, to act as a watchman for John Singleton. The application of A. C. V. Tipton for a special’s star was denied, because he was but 19 years old, the chief explained.

Policeman T. F. Rico was given a five days’ leave of absence.

The investigation of charges against Policeman Murray, made by J. D. Bethune, will be held at the next board meeting, next Tuesday morning, W. W. Weldeman will be Murray’s counsel.

This story first appeared here on Medium.

THE SALVATION ARMY ORLANDO CHANGES FOOD DISTRIBUTION TIME TO MEET NEED

To better meet needs, we are shifting our distribution to early afternoons.

 

February 23, 2021 | 1PM – 3PM

 

Who:    The Salvation Army Orlando Metro Area Command

What:   Our free weekly drive-thru food distribution has a new time! We will be handing out 300 fresh food boxes to families and individuals from 1 PM to 3 PM every Tuesday until further notice. Supplies are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. This free event is drive-thru only. Food resources for walk-ups and individuals on bicycles are available at our Social Services office, 400 West Colonial Drive in Orlando.

When:  February 23, 2021 | 1PM – 3PM

This event will reoccur every Tuesday until further notice.

Where: The Salvation Army Orlando Citadel – 440 West Colonial Drive.

 

For media, you can secure photos, videos, or interviews for this event, please contact Majorie Pierre.

 

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Stay informed about our events by following our Facebook Page.

The Salvation Army of Charlotte County has partnered with Pit Stop Auto Repair to chip in and help locals cover repair costs.

Pit Stop is currently offering discounted maintenance and repairs to those eligible. The Salvation Army will cover up to $250 per vehicle. Pit Stop will also provide discounts that may apply. Eligibility will be determined through an interview with a social worker.

Pit Stop has continued to collaborate with Salvation Army while expanding their partnership to locations across Southwest Florida.

“People are struggling,” said Port Charlotte Pit Stop employee Jorg Ebert. “They may need their car to get their kids to school, to shop at the grocery store or to attend job interviews. They need a safe, reliable car in order to do so.”

Ebert stated the Salvation Army administrator, Israel Roseno, reached out to the auto shop.

“We were willing to help and came to an agreement to work with the people they send our way,” said Elbert.

Pit Stop Auto Repair Owner Joseph Ramsay strives to support the community in many ways.

“Our core value is giving,” he said. “We hope the offer will prompt stability and growth, personally and financially.”

Ramsay stated the offer is ongoing and locals may benefit when car trouble comes unexpectedly.

“Jobs have been lost, incomes have been reduced, there have been changes we’ve been forced to face. No one plans on having a bad day,” said Ramsay. “Some people just need to get their kids to trombone lessons or whatever the case may be.”

Roseno hopes the Salvation Army will be able to offer their help for as long as the need remains. He said the organization received almost 50 voicemails over the first weekend.

For more information or for those seeking help, call the Salvation Army of Charlotte County at 941-629-3170, ext. 402.

Pit Stop also offers individuals a chance to win a car repair makeover through the Pit Stop Charitable Foundation. For those willing to share their story, visit www.PitStopCares.com.

 

By OLIVIA CAMERON Staff Writer | yoursun.com

food, covid relief, help, assistance, orlando, salvation army

 

For Immediate Release:

The Salvation Army Resume Weekly Food Distributions for Needy Families.

The Salvation Army works with community partners to disperse 1,320 food boxes to food-insecure areas.

ORLANDO, FL – (January 28, 2021) – The Salvation Army Orlando Metro Area Command is closely monitoring the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on local families. As we continue to meet the high demands for food and financial assistance, we are resuming our weekly food distributions to alleviate hunger in food-insecure households. Every Tuesday, we will disperse 1,320 food boxes through our drive-thru events and trusted community partners. We are giving away 300 food boxes this Tuesday, February 2nd, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. This drive-thru event will be at The Salvation Army Orlando Citadel located at 440 West Colonial Drive in Orlando.

“During the pandemic, The Salvation Army never closed our doors. We continue to fight for good and bring hope to those who are struggling,” said Captain Ken Chapman, area commander for The Salvation Army in Orange and Osceola Counties. Since the start of the pandemic, The Salvation Army has provided 74,223 fresh food boxes and 13,394 grocery bags to local families.

Every food box will have fresh fruits and/or vegetables, dairy products, poultry, and other nutritious goods to feed a family of four. Identification cards are required for multiple families traveling in one vehicle. Walk-ups or individuals on bicycles should take advantage of our Food Pantry located in our Women’s & Children’s Shelter at 400 West Colonial Drive.

As high demands for food and financial assistance persist, The Salvation Army Orlando Metro Area Command will host drive-thru food distributions every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. until further notice. To sign up as a volunteer or to donate, visit www.SalvationArmyOrlando.org. You can stay up to date with our services and events by following our Facebook page, The Salvation Army Orlando – Area Command.

 

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Sarasota Area CommandersPrior to their arrival in Sarasota County, Lt. Colonels Ward and Michele Matthews served as National Community Relations and Development Secretary and National Director for White House Relations, respectively,. Lt. Col. Ward Matthews also served as The Salvation Army’s national spokesperson.

Prior to their national headquarters appointment in 2018, Lt. Col. Ward Matthews was legal secretary, and Lt. Col. Michele Matthews was the Pathway of Hope director, both for The Salvation Army USA Southern Territory in Atlanta. Before those appointments, they served in leadership roles with the Dallas-Fort Worth Area Metroplex Command, Caribbean Territory, and Charlotte Area Command.

Their experience includes responsibility for more than 450 corporate partnerships during their time as Area Commanders in the Dallas-Fort Worth Area, including the Dallas Cowboys, which has raised more than $2.2 billion for The Salvation Army. They were also founding officers of The Salvation Army’s Echelon organization, now with 19 chapters across the country, which provides a forum for young professionals to engage in their respective communities.

Both Lt. Cols. have extensive experience working alongside first responders with The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services (EDS). At age 9, Ward volunteered on a Salvation Army mobile kitchen with his father in the aftermath of Hurricane Camille. Since that experience, Lt. Cols. Ward and Michele have served survivors and first responders of catastrophic events like Hurricane Ike, Hurricane Floyd, the Oklahoma City bombing, and the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks. Michele also served as the Caribbean Territory EDS director and as the EDS logistics coordinator for the Carolinas.

Lt. Col. Ward Matthews graduated Phi Beta Kappa with degrees in history and religion from Emory University before being commissioned as a Salvation Army officer in 1984. Lt. Col. Michele Matthews earned dual degrees in psychology and social services from Asbury College and a degree in nursing from Johns Hopkins University. Lt. Col. Michele Matthews was commissioned as a Salvation Army officer in 1999.

Sarasota Area Command | National Headquarters

Because of the financial hardship on so many this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and because of the fewer store locations allowing kettles to be set up, Captain Stephan Wildish knew something had to be done to ensure that the Tallahassee, FL Corps Red Kettle Goal of $215,000 was met.

With the campaign slogan of “Reaching New Heights to #Rescue Christmas”, Captain Wildish pledged to go 40 feet in the air for 24 hours with the goal of raising $24,000.

All of this took place on Giving Tuesday, December 1, 2020, in order to draw awareness of the great need in our community and the opportunity to give back. If he reached the goal before the 24 hour mark, he would get to come down early!

Thanks to United Rental in Tallahassee for their donation of a 40 foot scissor lift, Captain Wildish started his journey at 6:00am on Giving Tuesday to raise much needed funds.

On the coldest day of the season in Tallahassee (33 degrees at 6am), Captain Wildish lifted off. The funds started coming in rapidly! At 3:30 pm that afternoon, $21,000 had been raised! At 4:00pm, an anonymous donor stopped by the lift, called Captain Wildish on his cell phone, and stated that he would match dollar for dollar whatever was raised! By 6:30pm, Captain Wildish had exceeded his goal by raising $24,031.38. With the match, the campaign raised a total of $48,062.76!

Not only did he get to come down early on the coldest day of the season so far, but the Lord tremendously blessed his efforts.

With the support and work of the Tallahassee Corps Advisory Board and staff, media partners, a realty company that donated space, local supporters of our work, and even a local restaurant that donated lunch to the Captain, the goal was met and exceeded.

With the Lord’s blessing, Captain Stephan Wildish truly did “Reach New Heights to #Rescue Christmas” for the Tallahassee Community.

As we prepare for the upcoming Christmas season, here’s a look back at the 2019 Christmas Message from General Brian Peddle, The Salvation Army’s International Leader

By Brian Peddle, General

When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child (Luke 2:17).

When you experience something good, you just can’t help talking about it. That may be a memorable meal, a good book, an enjoyable film, stirring music, dramatic theater or beautiful countryside. Whatever the experience, it leaves such an impression on us that we want to share it with others. We have to share it! Good news needs to be shared.

These days, when people discover they are expecting a baby, many find creative ways to share the news; some hold parties to reveal the gender of the unborn baby; some have parties and—when the child is finally born—they announce it loud and clear.

Jesus’ birth was announced through a new, bright star that appeared in the sky. An angelic choir burst into song to communicate the great news.

Unsuspecting shepherds were looking after their sheep, like any other night, when the sky lit up and they heard the most astonishing news in a most spectacular way. An angel appeared to personally deliver a message to the shepherds (Luke 2:9-12). This was a detailed message—the angel clearly described who Jesus was (2:11) and how they would find him (2:12). So the shepherds journeyed to the manger and found Jesus “just as they had been told” (2:20).

Such was the impact of their experience on the hillside and in the stable, they just had to tell other people about it. The news was so joyous and tremendous that they couldn’t keep it to themselves. The news about Jesus brought light into the darkness of a shattered world. Like the shepherds, we need to realize that this good news is not just ours—it needs to be shared.

In my message to Salvationists and friends, employees and supporters this Christmas, I’m calling us to have a renewed confidence in the gospel. John the Baptist preached a message of repentance and prepared the way for Jesus. God sent his one and only son into this world to save it. Jesus then sent out his disciples to preach the good news, perform miracles and make disciples. At Pentecost, the Holy Spirit enabled the disciples to share the gospel in a myriad of languages and empowered the early church to spread the story of the Savior to new lands and new people.

The apostle Paul declared: “I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes” (Rom. 1:16). We are a Salvation Army—the gospel is the saving message we preach in words and express in actions.

The good news of Jesus brings hope to those who are lost, light to those in darkness, joy to those in despair. It offers real transformation to the person who is caught in addiction, disillusioned by materialism or seeking purpose and direction. We share the gospel because we have experienced its truth and power for ourselves, and we know, personally, the “author and perfecter,” so we have confidence in the gospel’s transformative power on others.

This Christmastime and beyond, let us follow the example set by the angels and shepherds. Let us use every opportunity and every means possible to spread the word about who Jesus is while showing people where they can find him so that they too can have a saving, personal relationship with the living Christ. It’s not just good news—it’s the best news. Let’s share it!

The post Good news needs to be shared appeared first on New Frontier Chronicle.

This past Thanksgiving was our family’s fifth without my mother-in-law, ninth without two sisters and a brother, and sixteenth without my grandmother. We felt the ache, mourned the loss, and wished with all our hearts they were still with us.

The holidays are coming and with it a slew of family gatherings. Unless you’ve been unusually fortunate, you’ll have an empty chair or two at your dining room table. It’s unrealistic to think you won’t miss your loved ones, but holidays are for celebrating, not for grieving. As you prepare for the holidays without your precious loved ones, here are a few ways you can honor them.

1. Do something your loved one would approve of.

My grandmother loved to dig in the dirt and make things grow. Wherever she lived, she always planted dianthus. I remember visiting her shortly after she moved to an independent living facility. She no longer had a place to garden, but as I walked into her new building, I saw evidence of her green thumb. She’d tucked a tiny patch of dianthus into a square of dirt near her doorway. To honor her, I planted dianthus in my flowerbed. Every time it bloomed, it reminded me of her.

One friend and his family are faced their first Christmas without their father/grandfather. Knowing that his dad loved Italy, my friend took his family on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Rome in his honor.

Your memorial activity will probably be less extravagant, but it can be equally memorable. One friend honors her daughter’s memory every season by watching her favorite Christmas movie, the Patrick Stewart version of “A Christmas Carol.” Another friend and her family meet at Waffle House at midnight on Christmas Eve to continue a long-standing tradition their late father began.

2. Include your loved one’s favorite food in your holiday meal.

My mother-in-law and I shared a love for lemon crème pie. She’d often tell the story of how she and a friend of hers liked it so much that they’d buy a pie, draw a line down the middle, and eat every bit of it. My mother-in-law liked her pies extra tart, and if I made the recipe just right, she’d nod her approval. “Mmm,” she’d say, “that’ll lock yer jaws.”

Lemon crème pie was one of the last foods I fed her before she passed away. Confined to a hospital bed and pumped full of medicine, she hadn’t eaten much in days. We wracked our brains trying to think of foods that might stimulate her appetite. My brother-in-law brought her a hot dog from her favorite greasy spoon. I brought a bowl of juicy watermelon. The day I brought her a slice of lemon crème pie, however, was a day to remember.

“Good?” I asked as I spooned bites into her eager mouth.

“Mmm,” she said, nodding her approval. “That’ll lock yer jaws.”

I ate a piece of lemon crème pie at Thanksgiving in her honor. It wasn’t quite tart enough, but I think she’d still approve.

Like eating my mother-in-law’s lemon pie, “sharing” our loved one’s favorite foods helps us feel connected with them. This Christmas we’ll eat sweet potato casserole to honor my sister Cindy and deep-fried turkey in my brother-in-law Luther’s name. And with every bite of lemon pie, I’ll feel my mother-in-law’s smile.

3. Talk about your loved one, shed a few tears, but don’t let grief steal the joy from your family celebration.

Remember that the greatest way we can honor a loved one who has passed away is to live every day in thanksgiving and joy. Reflect on the happy memories. Talk about the fun times and shared experiences. Thank God for the time you had rather than mourning the time you’ve lost.

4. Donate to an organization, charity, or cause your loved one felt passionate about.

If your mother had a soft spot for children, sponsor a child in her name. If your father loved baseball, donate a scholarship to a local league to help a child in need play ball next spring. If your aunt had a soft spot for animals, give to a nearby no-kill shelter.

Remember, too, that donations of time are infinitely valuable and honoring to a departed loved one. One friend helps serve Christmas dinner at a homeless shelter in memory of her father. Another fills a two-hour slot as a Salvation Army bell-ringer.

See also: 10 Reasons you should Volunteer to Ring a Bell this Christmas

Holidays can be hard, but with God’s grace and a little intentionality, we can celebrate in ways that honor and include our loved ones, even when they are no longer with us. If you’re facing the holidays without someone special, ask the Lord to wrap you in his love and help you feel the joy of his presence. Take comfort in the promise of Psalm 30:5, “Weeping may remain for a night, but rejoicing comes in the morning.”

by Lori Hatcher, originally appeared in the War Cry.

Alicia, a full-time candy store employee and mother of four, had her hours cut drastically when COVID-19 struck the U.S., causing her to fall $2,000 behind on her rent. With no other options left, Alicia turned to The Salvation Army. Alicia received $1,000 to help with rent, and she was able to pay the other $1,000. The Salvation Army also helped her with food assistance to further ease the financial burden.

“This helped me out a lot,” Alicia said. “Without The Salvation Army, I don’t think we would be able to continue to stay in this house that we’re in now. Anyone looking for help – The Salvation Army is your best bet. They work with you, and when they say they’re willing to help you, they follow up, step by step.”

Alicia is now back to work full-time and is continuing to work with The Salvation Army to earn her GED and high school diploma.

self sufficiencyBy: Antoinette Vitale

Fred enrolled in The Salvation Army’s Towers Center of Hope Men’s Transitional Housing program, Hope Crossing, in Jacksonville in April of 2019. His goal was to find permanent housing with wheelchair accessibility.

Hope Crossing provides transitional housing to men at The Towers Center of Hope and helps break the cycle of intergenerational poverty, situational and chronic homelessness through strength-based case management, community collaboration, and data-driven support. For those experiencing a recent eviction, domestic breakup, addiction issue, or any other housing crisis, The Salvation Army of Northeast Florida’s transitional housing provides homeless individuals with food and lodging, while equipping them with the resources and support needed to regain stability.

Fred previously lived in sub-standard housing before arriving at The Salvation Army shelter. At the time, he was using a walker that was not sufficient for his mobility needs. Fred is disabled due to a lower extremity amputation. Fortunately, a Salvation Army case manager assisted him in obtaining a motorized wheelchair, giving him mobility freedom.

After many months on the Section 8 waiting list, Fred received his Housing Choice Voucher from HUD in June of 2020. The social services team assisted him in finding housing by taking him to see apartments, completing the application process, and The Salvation Army provided the deposit and first month’s rent. His case management team secured furniture donations, including bedroom and living room furniture along with other household items to aid in Fred’s transition into permanent housing with necessary items.

Today, Fred has successfully achieved self-sufficiency in his own apartment that is ADA accessible. This is what success in Hope Crossing looks like.

Fred summed up his experience with The Salvation Army as a positive experience and stated, “you helped me with everything.”

 

The Salvation Army Modifies Service to Continue Providing Meals in Northeast Florida