A page from the Los Angeles Herald newspaper announcing Capt. Nellie Truelove’s commission as a member of the LAPD

On March 4, 1903, the Los Angeles Herald newspaper reported that Salvation Army Captain Nellie Truelove would be the first woman “to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority.”

Captain Nellie Truelove

Born in London in 1863, the aptly-named Capt. Truelove ran a home for “fallen” women at the turn of the 20th century in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.

The word “fallen” in those days referred to women who worked as prostitutes or were pregnant and unmarried.

Capt. Truelove’s rescue work involved spending days and nights in bars and brothels trying to ease the burden of women in trouble. She believed that no matter how dire the circumstance, there was hope for every woman she met.

Courtesy of California Digital Newspaper Collection

Often, she would be called on to referee disputes between the ladies in her care — or their clients — so the Los Angeles Police Department trusted her with the authority to keep the peace as an official member of the force.

Just one year after she received her star and billy club she died. Reportedly, among her last words were, “take care of my girls” and “it was worth it all.”

On the day of her funeral, the streets were lined with thousands of people as eight policemen led a white hearse drawn by four white horses. As her cortege passed the red light district, the bar owners and bartenders who knew her well stood outside with doors closed and hats off, out of respect.

The full article reads: 

She Wears A Star | Nellie Truelove Joins the Police Force

Salvation Lass Appointed by the Commission | May Exercise Authority at Rescue Home in East Los Angeles – Fryburg & Berkowitz Saloon License Case Ended – Police Duty at Schools

Demure little Nellie Truelove is a member of the Los Angeles police force, distinguished in that she is the first woman to be given a right to wear the nickel star and swing the black club of police authority. Nellie Truelove is used to the blue uniform and not unaccustomed to the exercise of authority, for, in addition to being a”policeman,” she is Staff Captain Nellie of The Salvation Army, in charge of the Salvation Army Rescue home on Griffith street in East Los Angeles. J. S. Slauson introduced The Salvation Army lass to Mayor Snyder; she was recommended, the mayor said, “by the best people of the city.”

When the police commission had waded through a part of the accumulation of business before it, the mayor called attention to the presence of “Staff Captain Nellie Truelove,” who asked to be clothed with police power. Commissioner Keeney wore his most cherubic smile when the blue-gowned young woman was presented. Commissioner Maglnnis, “the man from Mexico,” whose first appearance it was at a board meeting, looked as though he was glad that the mayor had given him the job.

Commissioner Lang wheeled about, so that he might be in range of the smiling but embarrassed face of the applicant for a place on the police force. The mayor, of course, was radiant. He is at his best when women are present. For instance, the other day he deliberately violated a city ordinance that he might do a woman a good turn. She called late in the afternoon to inform the mayor that a policeman had threatened her with arrest if she persisted in tooting her fish horn—the woman was a fish peddler. She said that she could not sell the fish If she might not toot the horn, and a stock on hands would be spoiled. The mayor told her to go on and blow the fish horn until her stock was sold, and if any policeman interfered, to refer him to the mayor.

Advice to Women

If you want anything from the mayor, just be a woman; he will find a way to gratify the want. When Nellie Truelove came with her unusual request, the mayor for a time was lost in doubt, but Herbert J. Goudge, the assistant city attorney, was called for counsel, and gave it as his opinion that there was nothing in the law governing the police department that forbade appointment of a woman.

Of course, she will be but a special “policeman,” her authority being confined to the rescue home, where often there are admitted women whose only fear is of a police officer. It is Impracticable to call upon the regular police every time there is a disturbance at the home, and It is not the wish of the home management to have every rebellious inmate arrested and taken to the police station.

The Fryburg & Berkowitz saloon license at 245 East First street, which has been in controversy for several weeks, was disposed of, by allowing the application for a transfer to Charles Toegel. Frank Reese asked for a continuance of one week to give Fryburg a chance to be heard. Toefcel wanted the matter settled and out of the way. His story of entering into partnership with Fryburg, as Toegel told it, was that of the innocent victim of an unscrupulous and designing lawbreaker. “After I learned that Fryburg was not what you might say an up and down honest man.” continued the speaker, he was anxious to get out of the partnership, and sold his interest in the business to the Los Angeles Brewing company.

Mayor Snyder will give paternal advice to the board of education, whose members authorized the board secretary to make a request for a. policeman who would be at all times ready to answer a call from superintendents of schools, when boys or girls became obstreperous and lost awe of the birch. The school board secretury made this pointed demand:

A Pointed Demand

“At a meeting of the board of education, held February 24, I was Instructed to communicate to you the request of the board that you detail a police officer who may be called upon at any time by the superintendents of schools, as cases very often occur where immediate action is necessary, and delays have many times occurred and the object been defeated because of there being no officer available when wanted.”

Chief of Police Elton assured the police board members that the house duty men at the police station are always available to be called to reinforce the school superintendents.

Pressman & Henry were granted a liquor license at 344 South Spring street, the license that was lost by Paul Kerkow for violation of the Sunday closing law.

J. K. Miller was allowed a transfer of his license from the Arcade station to the corner of Central and Ceres avenues. Edward Bode was made a special policeman, to act as a watchman for John Singleton. The application of A. C. V. Tipton for a special’s star was denied, because he was but 19 years old, the chief explained.

Policeman T. F. Rico was given a five days’ leave of absence.

The investigation of charges against Policeman Murray, made by J. D. Bethune, will be held at the next board meeting, next Tuesday morning, W. W. Weldeman will be Murray’s counsel.

This story first appeared here on Medium.

91402590_10163332654935333_1102329134912110592_n sanfordIn these days of social distancing, The Salvation Army in Seminole County (Sanford, Florida) is still committed to connecting with their community.

Over the course of several days, Salvation Army pastors and employees dropped off care packages on the doorsteps of church members and program participants, and even took boxes to a local assisted living facility for seniors that may be feeling the effects of isolation more acutely than others.

The care packages included food bags, water, snacks, activity books, cards, and other personal items.

“We have loved our people from afar,” says Major Julia Tarnue, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving Seminole County. “Smiles, hand waves and “hugs” through windows are not the norm, but I feel we are more connected than ever!”

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

Major Juan Guadalupe - COVID 19 feeding

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As a precautionary measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19, The Salvation Army in Manatee County (Bradenton, Florida) temporarily suspended its traditional community dinner offered weeknights.

This meal has always been free to anyone in the community in need – regardless if they are homeless or not.  Knowing this is a vital service, the decision was made to hold the community dinner outside and serve meals in to-go packages.

“Initially, we saw a drop-off in our numbers,” stated Tom Giglio, The Salvation Army’s Food Services Manager in Bradenton.  He added, “but now, with so many people losing their jobs and not knowing when they will see a paycheck again, we’ve seen a spike of new people coming for food.  We are seeing many more families than normal now.”

Since so many of the dinner patrons are not homeless, this gives them the opportunity to pick up meals for their family, while staying within the CDC social distancing guidelines and eat that meal in the comfort of their own homes.

Didi, a regular at the community dinner, is appreciative to be able to have a hot meal each evening.  She said, “I am so grateful that The Salvation Army is there to serve this dinner. I worried about what would happen when all of the restaurants had to close, but you are still here to help people like me.”

Mobile handwashing stations have also been put in place to give people a chance to wash their hands before handling their own dinner.  Clients staying at the shelter are also directed to wash their hands when they reenter the building.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

IMG_0793 landscape

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After spectators for the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg were barred from attending the race due to COVID-19 precautions, food vendors were left with an abundance of items.

With prepped cook-on-demand food, vendors could not travel home with the supplies and thankfully sought local charities to bless.

The men, women, and children at The Salvation Army shelter in St. Petersburg, Florida received salmon, seasoned pork loin, seasoned chicken, bacon, olives, and fresh fruit to enjoy on their weekend menu.

The Salvation Army is grateful to all of the community partners and donors helping continue service to individuals and families in need.

Donations of non-perishable food items, sanitizing supplies, and paper goods are needed across all Salvation Army pantries. Click here to find your local office.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

 

orlando tent shelter covid19 1 landscape

In order to comply with CDC recommendations for social distancing, The Salvation Army Orlando Area Command has erected a 5,200 square foot tent with 50 sleeping cots to accommodate emergency shelter guests. This tent is for current male shelter occupants who would otherwise have nowhere to go because of the additional space needed in the current shelter to abide by updated safety guidelines.

“Through this effort, we are keeping people safe and continuing to provide our regular services to those who are experiencing homelessness during this time of crisis in our community,” says Captain Ken Chapman, Administrator for The Salvation Army’s services in the Orlando area.

The temporary shelter for men was provided by the City of Orlando along with electrically powered fans. For those unable to stay in the shelter or tent, The Salvation Army is providing referrals to other resources and partner agencies.

The Salvation Army in Orlando is also still providing food assistance and clothing vouchers, and has modified community meals to be served in to-go containers for pick-up.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

sarasota church in a box covid19 2Churches across Florida are temporarily closed to follow increased COVID-19 safety precautions, causing pastors to get creative to continue ministering to those who worship across more than 40 Salvation Army churches in the state.

Lieutenants Will and Veronica Conley, pastors at The Salvation Army’s church in Sarasota, Florida, delivered ‘Church in a Box’ to their members to make sure they stayed connected.

“We first saw the concept of ‘Church in a Box’ from a Facebook post and we immediately knew this was something we wanted to do for our congregation,” says Lt. Veronica Conley, Corps Officer (Pastor).

Boxes were packed with doughnuts, hand sanitizer, tissues, worship guides, Sunday School materials, devotionals, as well as activities and games for adults, teens, and children.

“Not everyone is active on social media, and we liked the idea of offering a ‘hands-on’ approach to a worship experience,” says Conley. “Breakfast and fellowship are such a special time for our people on Sunday mornings, and you just can’t have Salvation Army fellowship without doughnuts!”

The ‘Church in a Box’ project is just one way The Salvation Army is letting people know how much they are loved and cared for, even during this season of social distancing. Several locations in Florida are live streaming weekly church services, Bible studies, and support groups.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

jacksonville march 2020

jacksonville story 2 3-21-20 resizeThe Salvation Army in Northeast Florida has shifted its daily meal ministry to provide meals from a field kitchen located outside of their Center of Hope facility in Downtown Jacksonville. The Meal Ministry program provides hot, nourishing meals for families and individuals in times of need every night of the year.

Bag lunches are also being provided to those who come to the food pantry for supplemental assistance. Each week, 250 income-eligible households are served through the food pantry, and the need is expected to grow over the coming months due to economic hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

“We appreciate the dedication of our staff going above and beyond their normal duties and schedules to serve others during this unprecedented time. We are following stated guidelines to protect our clients as well as our staff from exposure to the COVID-19 virus,” says Major Keath Biggers, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving Northeast Florida.

“We are also working closely with other community nonprofit agencies and the Mayor’s Task Force on homelessness for a unified best plan of action to serve the vulnerable population. As always, we appreciate the continued support of our friends, donors and volunteers that enable us to “Do the most Good, to the most people, in the most need.”

To ensure the safety of volunteers, staff, and recipients, no more than five individuals at a time are allowed entry into the food jacksonville story 3 3-21-20 resizepantry. Volunteers are required to wear gloves while serving; hand sanitizer and handwashing stations are available on site.

Projected impacts on the economy and workforce will likely force more Americans to seek rental, utility, and other forms of assistance.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

vero beach

vero beach serviceAfter the cancellation of a local county fair in the Vero Beach, Florida area, The Salvation Army was contacted by the county Emergency Operations Center to help several migrant workers that were stranded.

The sudden withdrawal of the fair due to COVID-19 precautions left them without a place to stay or enough funds to travel back home.

“In this pandemic, we will continue to care for the unseen and the forgotten,” says Captain Jay Needham, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving the Vero Beach area.

The Salvation Army provided meals for the workers while community partners and private donors helped purchase bus passes home to Arizona, Minnesota, and Tennessee.

The numbers of stranded workers were originally 40-45, and those continue to dwindle as connections are made for transportation.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

universal orlando donation

Universal Orlando Resort in Orlando, Florida, which is temporarily closed due to COVID-19 precautions, has donated truckloads of perishable food items to The Salvation Army.

A recent truckload included apples, oranges, potatoes, and other fresh produce that was distributed to current shelter clients, seniors citizens, and those experiencing hardships due to the impact of the recent outbreak.

“We have been serving the populations most vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic, the homeless and senior citizens each day. This generous donation means we can serve so many more in need,” says Captain Ken Chapman, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving the Orlando area.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.

preparing meals lakeland

delivering meals in lakelandIn trying times associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, many schools, churches, and community programs across the United States are closed and, as a result, many young people are in search of nourishment to replace missed meals. In Lakeland, Florida, that is certainly the case, and The Salvation Army is stepping into the gap.

While The Salvation Army Lakeland Corps (church) did not have scheduled services on Sunday, March 15 in order to maintain recommended social distancing, members from the church came, as they do each week, to prepare breakfast.

This meal was then delivered to children that depend on it, with three families that regularly attend weekly activities currently living in hotel rooms.

“Knowing that many of our children rely upon school and corps feeding programs, it became apparent that we would need to step in and fill the food gap for a while until the COVID 19 situation improves,” says Major Barry Corbitt, Administrator for The Salvation Army serving the Lakeland area. “We are grateful for caring church members who go the extra mile to care for our kids.”

The Salvation Army plans to continue this service, beginning on Wednesday evening, in an effort to meet human need.

preparing meals lakeland

*NOTE: These resources are currently only being provided to individuals previously enrolled in The Salvation Army’s programs.

Click here to learn about The Salvation Army’s national response to coronavirus COVID-19.

If you would like to submit a prayer request or a request for one of our pastors to call you for prayer, please visit www.SalvationArmyFlorida.org/pray.

Click here to help The Salvation Army continue meeting needs in your community.