William and Catherine Booth build a movement by preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ to the destitute in London’s East End.

William Booth embarked upon his ministerial career in 1852, desiring to win the lost multitudes of England to Christ. He walked the streets of London to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to the poor, the homeless, the hungry and the destitute.

Booth abandoned the conventional concept of a church and a pulpit, instead taking his message to the people. His fervor led to disagreement with church leaders in London, who preferred traditional methods. As a result, he withdrew from the church and traveled throughout England, conducting evangelistic meetings.

In 1865, William Booth was invited to hold a series of evangelistic meetings in the East End of London. He set up a tent in a Quaker graveyard, and his services became an instant success. His renown as a religious leader spread throughout London, and he attracted followers who were dedicated to fight for the souls of men and women.

To congregations who were desperately poor, he preached hope and salvation. His aim was to lead people to Christ and link them to a church for further spiritual guidance.

Many churches, however, did not accept Booth’s followers because of their past. So Booth continued giving his new converts spiritual direction, challenging them to save others like themselves. Soon, they too were preaching and singing in the streets as a living testimony to the power of God.

In 1867, Booth had only 10 full-time workers, but by 1874, the number had grown to 1,000 volunteers and 42 evangelists, all serving under the name “The Christian Mission.” Booth assumed the title of general superintendent, with his followers calling him “General.” Known as the “Hallelujah Army,” the converts spread out of the East End of London into neighboring areas and then to other cities.

While reading a printer’s proof of the 1878 annual report, Booth noticed the statement “The Christian Mission is a volunteer army.” Crossing out the words “volunteer army,” he penned in “Salvation Army.” From those words came the basis of the foundation deed of The Salvation Army.

From that point, converts became soldiers of Christ and were known then, as now, as Salvationists. They launched an offensive throughout the British Isles, in some cases facing real battles as organized gangs mocked and attacked them. In spite of violence and persecution, some 250,000 people were converted under the ministry of The Salvation Army between 1881 and 1885.

Our founders

William Booth

William Booth began The Salvation Army in 1865 as a means to help the suffering souls throughout London who were not willing to attend—or even welcomed into—a traditional church.

Thieves, prostitutes, gamblers and drunkards were among his first converts to Christianity, and as his ministry grew, the gospel of Jesus Christ was spread far and wide to the poor, the vulnerable and the destitute.

Though General Booth died in 1912, he laid a firm foundation for the life-saving work that The Salvation Army continues to perform today in 131 countries.

Catherine Booth

Catherine Booth was known as the “Army Mother.” In her world, women had few rights, no place in the professional sphere, and a minimal presence in church leadership.

Yet in her marriage to William Booth, she became an evangelist, preacher, theologian and co-founder of The Salvation Army.

A truly passionate Christian, Catherine believed loving God meant loving people through action. Her legacy of love, sacrifice and service continues to shape The Salvation Army today.

Booth children

They were Bramwell, Ballington, Kate, Emma, Herbert, Marie, Evangeline and Lucy. Bramwell and Evangeline later became Generals of The Salvation Army.

The post How William and Catherine Booth started The Salvation Army appeared first on New Frontier Chronicle.

General Peddle

General Brian Peddle, International leader of The Salvation Army, has issued a global call to pray for women and girls in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which identified 12 critical areas of concern for women and girls.

“I’m asking you to join me in a cry for justice,” said Peddle in a special video message. “A heartfelt longing to deal with the wrongs of this world.”

In the video, Peddle describes “probably the greatest injustice of our age”: the fact that half the world’s population start life at a disadvantage simply because they are female.

In his call to prayer, Peddle cites up-to-date statistics that illustrate the scale of the issue: 71 percent of all trafficked people are female. A third of all women and girls experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime. Women do three times more unpaid care work than men – currently valued at $10 trillion USD per year.

“But even that huge number,” said Peddle, “still doesn’t capture the full extent of women’s lost economic potential.”

Spearheaded by The Salvation Army’s International Social Justice Commission (ISJC), the year of prayer will also include practical action. The Commission on the Status of Women, held at the United Nations’ New York headquarters from March 9-20, will include reports on The Salvation Army’s ministry with women and girls.

The Salvation Army is also leading or hosting a rich series of parallel events for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other stakeholders. These include coordinating sessions entitled “The Girl Child,” “Sisters for Sale” and “Women in Power” as well as hosting discussions at the ISJC headquarters run by other NGOs, such as “Using Data to Drive Inclusion and Accountability in Technology” (AnitaB.org), “Empowerment of Refugee Girls Through a Network of Education Opportunities” (Embrace Relief) and “Shoulder to Shoulder: Men and boys supporting women and girls to achieve gender equality” (28 Too Many).

The ISJC has added resources to its website on “How to Pray for Justice” and “Women and the Sustainable Development Goals” from UN Women, in order to help focus and inform prayers.

Participants are encouraged to sign up to show their support. An online discussion space invites those who pray to share how God is speaking to them, how they are responding and to share any Bible verses or other resources that others may find helpful.

“As we seek justice together, we do so in the knowledge that Jesus promised that, for those who cry out to him day and night, God will see that they get justice,” General Peddle said in his video message. “Not only that, but he told his followers that God will grant this justice quickly. So don’t wait! Sign up now and join me in this wave of prayer that will sweep around the globe.”

Watch the General’s video message, find out more and get involved at http://sar.my/cryforjustice.

coronavirus

Salvation Army members and staff in Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan are continuing to provide assistance in the 2019 Novel Coronavirus outbreak despite restrictions that have been put in place to slow the spread of the virus.

“Even with the anxiety surrounding the Novel Coronavirus here in Hong Kong and Macau, we are very proud of the corps officers, soldiers and staff from our social services who brave the uncertainties and visit many families in their communities – especially the elderly and house-bound – to provide them with essential foodstuffs, meals and masks for their protection,” said Major Eva Chow, Corporate Communications Director for The Salvation Army’s Hong Kong and Macau Command.

The Hong Kong and Macau governments have implemented enhanced disease prevention and control measures to reduce the flow of people between the mainland and Hong Kong-Macau borders.

Hong Kong has already suspended passenger clearance services in 10 control points and plans are in place for a 14-day mandatory quarantine on all people entering Hong Kong from the mainland. Macau has tightened its border policy and has suspended government administration, social services and schools.

To mitigate close contact and potential infection, programs and activities in Salvation Army corps have been suspended, although some corps have used recording or live-streaming to share Sunday worship. Major fundraising and events have also been suspended.

All classes in our 35 educational services – from kindergartens to schools – are suspended until March 2, and the social centers and services for seniors are suspended or have limited service. Staff have begun working from home or split teams to keep essential programs operating. These measures have been taken as a result of restrictions from the respective Hong Kong and Macau authorities.

Other centers – including command headquarters – are running limited services and adopting working from home policies where possible. Staff in the two offices on mainland China have reported back to work after being required to stay at home, but they have a shortage of face masks. Office personnel have shared concerns, but are holding up well despite the anxieties they face.

As there is an acute shortage of surgical masks, the command has appealed to International Emergency Services and the wider Salvation Army for assistance. When they have been sourced, the masks will primarily be used by frontline personnel, students, service clients and residents.

In the meantime, enhanced personal hygiene practices are in place at home and in offices, corps, schools and centers.

“God is our great healer and no disease or illness will prevail against him,” said Lieutenant-Colonel Bob Lee, Officer Commanding the Hong Kong and Macau Command. “We stand on this truth as the world battles against this damaging virus. We stand united with one another and pray God’s peace and healing for the nations.”

Writing from Taiwan, Regional Commander Major David Kinsey reports that, in a country where masks are worn extensively, they are being worn by everyone in public places – even by Westerners. It is now actually mandatory to wear a face mask in public places, like hospitals and government offices, and Taiwan has issued rationing on mask purchases.

“Whilst there has naturally been an increase in feelings of anxiety and fear, mainly with the elderly and vulnerable,” Kinsey said, “Within Salvation Army circles, I am sensing an attitude of carefulness balanced with a resoluteness to ‘carry on.’ The coronavirus has obviously featured highly in the topics of prayer and it has been encouraging to hear a sense of faith and trust in God.

“The Taiwan Region is considering whether or not to continue with some key public events over the next six months and leadership is considering a response to the continued need for provision, for example through our homelessness caring center in Taipei.”

As plans are made for the coming days, Kinsey is certain that the Taiwan Region “will continue to be and show the love of Jesus Christ.”

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The post How The Salvation Army is responding to Coronavirus in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan appeared first on New Frontier Chronicle.

Emergency Disaster Services

The Salvation Army began offering assistance to disaster survivors after a major hurricane hit Galveston, Texas in September 1900, destroying the coastal city and killing thousands of people. At the request of The Salvation Army’s National Commander, Commissioner Frederick Booth-Tucker, officers from across the country moved into the Galveston area to help feed and shelter thousands of survivors, while also providing much needed emotional and spiritual support.

Since then, The Salvation Army has responded to natural disasters, transportation accidents, civil unrest situations, and terrorist attacks. By providing beverages, meals and emotional and spiritual care to first responders and survivors, The Salvation Army strives to bring hope and healing to people who find themselves in the midst of extremely difficult situations.

While each disaster creates its own unique circumstances and special needs, Salvation Army disaster relief efforts focus on seven core services. These services may be modified based on the magnitude of the disaster and adapted to meet the specific needs of individual survivors.

Training

The first step in being ready to respond to an emergency is training. In partnership with other agencies, The Salvation Army’s disaster training program offers a variety of courses designed to help individuals and communities prepare for emergency events and become trained disaster volunteers.

Food Service

When disaster strikes, one of the first signs that help is on the way is often the arrival of a Salvation Army mobile feeding unit, offering meals, snacks and drinks to rescue workers and survivors.

Emotional and Spiritual Care

Motivated by Christian faith, The Salvation Army deploys specially trained individuals to offer emotional and spiritual care to rescue workers and disaster survivors.

Emergency Communications

The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) includes a worldwide network of volunteer amateur radio operators and other communications specialists, who may be mobilized to transmit emergency information during a disaster event.

Disaster Social Services

After a family has lost everything in a disaster, The Salvation Army is there to provide emergency assistance to help meet survivors’ most urgent needs for food, clothing, shelter and medical services.

Donations Management

The Salvation Army is one of the nation’s leaders in responsibly collecting, sorting and distributing donated goods. The Salvation Army encourages cash donations as the best and most flexible way to help and solicits only those in-kind donations that can be effectively received and efficiently distributed.

Recovery

The Salvation Army supports long-term disaster recovery operations with flexible programming that is adaptable to the unique needs of individual communities.

Find out more, including how to volunteer with The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services, by visiting SalArmyEDS.org.

Original Article

Psychology Behind AddictionEdwyn Hector has worked for The Salvation Army for six years.

By Abagail Courtney –

In the U.S. Marine Corps, semper fidelis, or “always faithful,” signifies the dedication and loyalty that individual Marines have for each other and their country, even after leaving service. For Edwyn Hector, that couldn’t be more fitting.

Though he’s now retired from his six-year command as a Reconnaissance man, Hector’s still faithfully serving his fellow comrades. Only now, he’s doing it through his work at The Salvation Army’s shelter.

Shortly after leaving the Marine Corps, Hector found himself a spectator in a civilian world. What he saw were veterans, not unlike himself, wrestling with psychosis, addiction, homelessness and the unresolved traumas that stemmed from military life. Between his military experience and background in psychology, he knew he could make a lasting impact for these men and women but wasn’t sure where to start.

One evening, not long after, he saw a commercial promoting The Salvation Army’s local shelter. It mentioned the facility’s work to help those facing addiction and homelessness. Hector showed up the next day to the shelter with a heart to help and a resume in hand.

Fast-forward six years, Hector is now one of two facilitators in charge of education and training at the shelter and has helped more than 3,000 individuals work through recovery and gain control of their addictions. Much of that work focuses on training thoughts and mindsets through positive reframing and the ability to recognize, accept and manage feelings.

Conquering addiction—a disease that the Surgeon General says will affect one in seven Americans—can be accomplished by consistently practicing these four things, according to Hector: Recognizing your feelings, identifying what they are, processing them and getting back to glad.

“Your actions come from your feelings. We allow a lot of people and places and things to dictate our feelings; this means we allow people, places and things to dictate our lives,” he said.

With that in mind, Hector focuses on the six emotions with which all people are born: happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust. Once understood, the goal pivots toward recognizing, identifying, processing and taking responsibility for those emotions in order to avoid a relapse when life gets difficult.

Hector often poses questions during group sessions to help get the proverbial wheels turning: How can somebody make you a certain way? Do your feelings not come from your own mind? Who operates your mind? So where do your feelings come from?

“When they say ‘from me,’ I say ‘there you go—now you aren’t putting it on people, places, things,” he said. “Now you are putting it on your own self and now, what we need to do is practice on changing our perception.’ We can work with that.”

While such exercises have proven immensely helpful to many clients, Hector says the most valuable thing anyone in the program can extract from group sessions is knowing their worth.

“There is not another person on the planet that will ever exist like you again,” he said. “Everything you have on that body of yours is unique, and guess what? Our creator gave that to you to work with—just you—no one else. That’s how priceless you are—that is your worth.”

Many of the men Hector’s worked with at the shelter credit him with helping to kickstart that process. One of them was Dillion Toscano, who landed at the shelter several years ago after racking up a “resume” of 25 years of drug addiction, seven misdemeanors, four felonies.

“I had to learn the difference between sobriety and recovery and understand the emotions behind why I was using all of those years,” Toscano said. “There was one man who was responsible for me understanding that and ultimately being successful in recovery, and that was Edwyn Hector.”

After seeing so many of his friends come back from war without limbs or sight or hearing and still being eternally grateful for every breath given to them, Hector said he’s learned that loving yourself is where healing, peace, and change begin.

“You don’t get a second go around at this thing, so it’s time to be kind to you,” he said. “It’s time to love who you are to the fullest.”

Original Post

Many of the organization’s food banks anticipate an increase in need if the standoff continues.

Nearly four weeks into what’s become the longest government shutdown in U.S. history, many across the country are beginning to feel the financial impact of the impasse.

Many of the more than 800,000 federal workers and roughly 4 million more government contractors affected have now missed their first paycheck. For some of them, this may mean they need to reign in their spending on non-essentials, or simply tighten their monthly budget. But for others living paycheck to paycheck, missing just one could mean they can’t pay their mortgage, or afford groceries, medicine, or child care.

The Salvation Army is one of several groups stepping up to offer some relief to furloughed government employees, those working without pay, or anyone else affected, as they navigate the unexpected stress and financial hardship triggered by the partial shutdown.

Lt. Liz Blusiewicz, corps officer in Huntington,..